GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com
PALMS & SAGOS PAGE
 
 HOME
Tour Our Destination Websites Taxco-Today.com Oaxaca-Today.com Montserrat-Today Site
See our silver designs at Krika.com Read our travel stories and other tales at Krika.com

Click below to see our plants alphabetically listed by common name with their cures and cooking ideas

 
 or, Search for Latin names and more here!

 
**Bamboo Palm Tree, Areca Chrysalidocarpus lutescens or Chamaedorea seifrizii or Chamaedorea erumpens
This is a lovely clumping type of palm whose one and a half to two inch thick stems look much like bamboo. It grows to be between fifteen and thirty feet tall and is just about as wide as it is tall when fully grown. You can also plant the stems individually, but they seem less interesting and lonely planted that way.
Benefits: This is one of those special plants that clean the air for you and expect very little in return. If you are moving into a new home or apartment or if you have recently purchased new furniture or rugs the bamboo palm is perfect for you -- it removes formaldehyde from the air. Off gassing of the products used in furniture and home construction are loaded with formaldehyde which is not at all good for you to say the least.
Great at removing formaldehyde from the air, the bamboo palm is also low-maintenance: Just put it where it will get a couple of hours of direct sunlight, and water it regularly.
From:
Central America
Photographed: In the garden at our former home in Montserrat 2008 and in the Jardin Botanique in Tahiti in 2013.
Planting and Care:
We have seen them growing in full sun and light shade. In Montserrat, our small one was growing pretty much in full shade and was beautiful. They are said to like a moist soil, but we did not find that one to be particularly picky; it survived a long drought while we were away one year with no apparent damage. As they mature, they are said to become more hardy. We now have a couple of dozen large clumps of well established bamboo palms surrounding our property in Guatemala. They are hardy and wonderful.
Text and Photographs Copyrighted ©Krika.com 2008 and ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013

If you have the space, bamboo palms make lovely hedges providing shade while making a strong tropical landscape statement. The photograph below was taken looking into the garden from the parking lot at the Jardin Botanic in Tahiti in 2013.
 
**Cabbage Palm Tree, Christmas Palm Roystonea oleracea or Veitchia merrilli or Adonidia merrilli
This tree is the tallest member of the palm family. It has frothy leaves and red berry clusters. The cabbage palm grows pretty slowly relative to everything else in the garden. Even at its happiest with the right soil, water and sun it is SLOW. Maybe the reason is the amount of tree trash it produces as surely that takes up a lot of energy. We have continual leaf dropping, elaborate flower bearing stems and the seed bearing red berries you can see in the photo to the left. Each berry surrounds one seed and thousands are produced each year. The tree makes a great effort to do this, despite the fact that each of the seeds in the berries seems viable and ready to grow with no encouragement. This is a beautiful tree that expends great effort to insure its future generations.
Photographed: At our former home in Montserrat.
Planting and Care: Our experience with these trees is that they prefer full sun, a rich soil and routine rainfall or watering to be at their best. If they find themselves growing in less advantageous situations, they grow more slowly and look sort of peaked. The photograph to the right shows what can happen to these palms in a strong tropical storm with high winds. Aptly, the damage done is called wind burn and there is nothing you can do about it but wait for the damaged leaves to be gradually replaced.
Gardening Suggestion: If you have one or more of these lovely trees, think about cutting off the flower stems before they fruit and drop seeds. It will save you hours of clean up or weeding later.
Text and Photographs Copyrighted ©Krika.com 2008

 

Chocho Palm Astrocaryum mexicanum
From: Mexico
Photographed: In the (Ortobotanico) Botanical Garden in Naples, Italy, in 2014.
Planting and Care:

Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2015
 

Cliff Date Palm Phoenix rupicola
From: Cliff sides and mountainous terrain in forested areas of India and Bhutan 
Photographed: In the Botanical Garden in Naples, Italy.

Text & Photograph Copyrighted © KO 2008

**Coconut Palm Tree Cocos nucifera
Our old favorite. New trees will usually begin bearing in three to five years and will eventually reach from forty to sixty feet tall. We had one great old tree which always seemed to be covered in unreachable nuts.
Benefits: When opened and sun dried, coconuts form a material called copra which is the source of coconut oil used in cooking and in making soap (see the recipe below for making coconut oil). From Yahoo News we get even more information on the glories of coconut, "It's the fruit that has supplied water, food and oil to societies around the world through generations. And, it has also been found to provide relief to multiple illnesses like hepatitis, osteoporosis and diabetes."
Diseases: The truly disastrous disease called lethal yellowing has killed coconut palms all the way from Miami to Mexico and the Caribbean. There are some reasonably effective though laborious treatments, but there is no real cure. The only alternative is to plant dwarf varieties which are immune, but no where near as attractive or as productive of coconuts. Malpan is said to be one very disease resistant variety.
Fruit: Immature coconuts are the source of coconut water.
Planting and Care: Give a fertilizer to the coconut palm only in the spring.

Recipe:  Coconut Oil
Coconut oil has a creamy coconut flavor and is best used on medium heat as it will burn on high heat.
1. Husk old coconuts that have no liquid inside (give the coconut a shake to hear whether there is liquid inside). Grate them or put them through a food grinder and let the coconut soak in water to cover for about a day.
2. Drain the grated coconut, saving the water. Squeeze the grated coconut as hard as you can saving the milk to mix with the saved water. Let it sit a while and then gently put this mixed liquid in the refrigerator overnight. In the cool air the coconut oil will rise to the top of the water forming a "cake."
3. Remove the cake and heat it on the stove to a gentle boil to remove all of the water that may remain. As this process goes on the oil will become very clear. Being careful to keep the oil at a simmer (coconut oil has a low boiling point) be sure that all of the water is gone and then cook it a little more. Water left in the oil will very much reduce its useful life.

Text & Photograph Copyrighted © KO 2008
 
**Dwarf Coconut Palm Tree
Given to us in 2003 by our friend Roots in Montserrat, it was gone from our garden when we returned from a long holiday.
Diseases: The dwarf coconut is resistant to the lethal yellowing disease that has caused the destruction of so many coconut plantations in the Caribbean, Mexico and elsewhere. Though it is no where near as majestic as the real thing, the dwarf coconut might have proven a viable option if we only hadn't taken a vacation.
Yield: You can expect the dwarf coconut to bear fruit four years after it is planted.
Text Copyrighted © KO 2008
 

Date Palm Phoenix dactylifera
This is one of those wonderful plants that mirrors the best of our humanity. To bear fruit, the date palm requires a male and female tree in relatively close proximity. On the Greek island of Naxos we stopped in a small coastal town for a night. Behind our lovely hotel were several fruit laden lemon trees and many artichoke plants. In the front of our room was a lovely windowed balcony overlooking the sea beside two beautiful date palms. We spoke with the older owners and with their son who happened to be visiting that weekend and learned of the male and female relationship of the date palm. I found it charming.
Benefits: Who is it that doesn't love dates?
From:
The Middle East probably near Iran.
Planting and Care:
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014

If you would like to read my story of our visit to Naxos, here is the link to it,

http://www.krika.com/STORIES%20GREECE/NAXOS.html

Photographed: In public gardens in Malaga, Spain, in 2014.

Photographed: In the Jardim de Olhao, in Agadin, Morocco, in 2014.

Photographed: In public gardens in Malaga, Spain, in 2014.

 
 

FAN PALMS

This is an ever expanding group of palms that I am currently at a complete loss to identify apart from including them in the group. Except for enjoying the photographs of these wonderful trees, you may think of this category of palms as "under construction" and get back to it later. If you have any help to offer I would be very grateful to hear from you.

 
Bismarck Palm Bismarkia nobilis
These stunning gray green palms will grow to be 60 feet tall eventually, but I think you'll have a long time to wait. Buy one as large as you can, plant it and enjoy.
Benefits:
From:
Madagascar
Planting and Care: This is not one of the winter tolerant palms and it needs a lot of space. On the plus side it is drought tolerant and given more heat it will grow faster making it perfect for relatively dry tropical gardens.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2012

Photographed: At the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.

Photographed: At the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.

 

Photographed: In the Palermo Botanical Garden in Sicily, Italy, in 2012

Photographed: At the Hotel Riviera also on Lake Atitlan.

 
Caranday Palm Trithrinax campestris
Carandays grow under difficult circumstances, but can reach a height of just under 20 feet. As they grow they maintain their old foliage to give them some protection.
Benefits:
From:
Uruguay and northern Argentina
Photographed: In the Botanical Garden in Palermo, Sicily, in Italy in 2012.
Planting and Care: The caranday palm likes a tough life preferring an arid climate and rocky soil.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014
 
 
Dwarf Palmetto Sabal minor
  Benefits:
From:

Photographed: In the Botanical Garden in Naples, Italy, in 2014.
Planting and Care:
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2015
 

European Fan Palm Chamaerops humilis
This is a slow growing rather small variety of palm; it grows to be only about 10 feet tall.
From: Areas around the Mediterranean
Photographed: On the left in the Carlos Thays Botanical Garden in Buenos Aires Argentina, below on the left in the Palermo Botanical Garden in Sicily, Italy, and on the right also in Buenos Aires.
Planting and Care: This palm is relatively cold hardy, being able to handle frosts with no problem. In fact it doesn't grow well in hot climates. It prefers full sun and is pretty indifferent to soil quality.

Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2012
 

 
**Fan Palm, Lankan Palm Lantana litigious or Copernica baileyana
This is a spreading palm with fan-shaped fronds.
Text & Photographs Copyrighted © KO 200

 

Joey Palm, Diamond Joey Johannesteijsmannia altifrons
This is a very striking plant which grows without a trunk, leaves emerging one after the other at ground level.
Benefits:
From:
Thailand, Borneo, Sumatra, Indonesia and Malaysia
Photographed: In the Royal Botanic Garden in Sydney, Australia, in 2013.
Planting and Care: As you can see from the area of the world that the Joey Palm first lived, it is tropical in nature though it can survive in the warmest humid areas of the US.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014

 
Lady Palm Rhapis excelsa
Benefits: According to an article on Yahoo news, this palm is an air cleaning plant that will free "...your air of chemicals, including ammonia, and [it is] is highly resistant to insects."
From:
Southern China and there about's
Photographed:   In the Royal Botanical Gardens in Sydney, Australia, 2013.
Planting and Care: It is said to be fairly easy to care for preferring low light and being happy in a low humidity environment.
Text Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013
 

Mediterranean Fan Palm Chamaerops humilis
This modest and appealing palm is full and lovely while keeping itself to about 20 feet in height.
Benefits:
From:
Southern Europe and Northern Africa
Photographed: In the Palermo Botanical Garden in Sicily, Italy.
Planting and Care: This is another excellent choice for a xeriscape garden as the Mediterranean Fan Palm is drought tolerant. Happily it is also tolerant of cold and it is accepting of a wide variety of soils. It does, however, want to grow in full sun.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2012
 
Rock Palm Brahea dulcis
This beauty is one of what I call the "lazy frond" palms. They are not stiff, but laze about a little just like I like to do. They are quite lovely to see in the garden by your chaise lounge.
Benefits:
From:
Mexico
Photographed: In the Palermo Botanical Garden in Sicily, Italy.
Planting and Care: This is a very slow growing palm so if you wish, buy the size you want or close to it as it will be that size and a little bit for a very long time. In the end it will be about 12 feet tall and 8 feet wide. The rock palm prefers low humidity and as you would assume, it is drought tolerant. It also has some tolerance to frost, but not to freezing temperatures. It likes to have a regular dose of a moderate amount of water and to live in full sun.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2012

 

Fan Palm Mystery #1
Photographed:
In the Botanical Garden at the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©KO 2010

Hint:
Do you think this could be a
Miraguama Palm Coccothrinax miraguama
From: Cuba??

 

Fan Palm Mystery #2
Nicknamed: "Very Hairy Palm"
Photographed:
At the entrance to the Hotel Riviera on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted © KO 2010

Fan Palm Mystery #3
Photographed: On the grounds of the Hotel Riviera on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted © KO 2010

 

 

Fan Palm Mystery #4
This beautiful palm lived under our orange flowering flamboyant tree. It is hard to know which of the palms it actually is from the photographs we've seen in garden books so if you can identify it, please drop us a line.
Photographed:
These are two photographs of our lovely fan palm, one taken in 2003 and one five years later in our garden at our former home in Montserrat.
Text and Photographs Copyrighted © Krika.com 2003/2008

 

Fan Palm Mystery #7
Hint:
This may be a Livistona chinensis from China.
Photographed: In the Botanical Garden in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 2011.
Text Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring 2011

Fan Palm Mystery #8
Benefits:
From:

Photographed: In the Carlos Thays Botanical Garden in Buenos Aires, Argentina.
Planting and Care:
Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013

Note: This palm looks very similar to my mystery #22 below, but the leaves seem to be wider.

 

Fan Palm Mystery #22
As you can see in the photograph, this seems to be a smaller yet still very attractive version of the very large Bismarck Palm.
Benefits:
From:

Photographed: In the Palermo Botanical Garden in Sicily, Italy.
Planting and Care:
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2012

Fan Palm Mystery #24
Benefits:
From:

Photographed: In the Palermo Botanical Garden in Sicily, Italy.
Planting and Care:
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2012

 

Fan Palm Mystery #25b
Photographed: In city gardens in Malaga, Spain.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2012

Fan Palm Mystery #26
Photographed: In Jardim de Olhao, in Agadiz, Morocco in 2014.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2012

 

Palm Tree Mystery #27
Photographed: At the Magdelena Hotel in Tobago in 2018.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2018

 
 
 

**Fish Tail Palm Caryota mitis
Like the bamboo palm, the fishtail palm is a clumping variety growing only to about twenty or thirty feet. It is very hardy as palms go and can even survive a good bit of drought.
From: India
Photographed: In the garden at our former home in Montserrat
Planting and Growth: With overall tolerance to a range of soils, light conditions (full sun to semi shady) and moisture levels, it sounds almost too perfect and it is -- all parts of the fishtail contain an irritant so keep your hands off! In our experience we have found that this palm likes a good bit of water on a regular basis, although it will survive without it.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted © Krika.com 2008
 
**Florida Royal Palm, Cuban Royal Palm Roystonia elata
This is our most magnificent palm. It is about sixty feet tall with more than a foot thick smooth cement colored trunk. The debris from this tree is significant, so when a frond falls we run! The heavy fronds are more than twelve feet long. The characteristics that distinguish the cabbage and royal palms are not particularly easy to observe, but after seven years we finally did it. The berries on a cabbage palm are red; on a royal palm they are a dark purple. Though the trunks on these palms are similar in color, the royal palm's is smoother. Regardless of which tree you have growing, they are both wonderful. In truth, I'd have to say I rather like the royal palm a bit better than the cabbage palm (even its name sounds a little better, don't you think?).
Photographed:
Just above the shady terrace garden at our former home in Montserrat
Planting and Care: Capable of reaching seventy feet when full grown, this palm prefers fertile soil and lots of water to look its best along with an acid soil.
Text and Photographs Copyrighted © KO 2008

 
Lipstick Palm, Red Sealing Wax Palm Cyrtostachys Renda or C. lakka
This is a striking plant and hence is coveted enough to have endangered it in the wild. Just imagine paying $1000 US for just one plant.
  Benefits:
From:
Southern Malaysia, Borneo and Sumatra
Planting and Care: As you can imagine from its home place in the world, this palm will like it humid, even wet, and hot. Give it some shade or full sun and a soil that is not too rich in nutrients and it will do just fine.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014

Photographed:  In the Jardin Botanique in Tahiti in 2013.

 

Photographed: In the Botanical Garden in Sydney, Australia, in 2013.

Photographed: In the Botanical Garden in Sydney, Australia, in 2013.

 

Pacaya Palm Tree Chamaedorea tepejilote
This is a small palm, never reaching more than 20 or 30 feet in height. It is delightful for its decorative seeds as seen in the photograph below on the left.
Benefits: The pacaya produces seed pods about 12 to 14" long each filled with the soft seeds you see in the photograph below on the right. The seed pods are sold in the local market during the season. The seeds are cooked and used as a vegetable, often in omelets. I find the taste similar to hearts of palm one of my favorite tropical foods.
From: Central and Northern South America
Photographed: At the Hotel San Buenaventura on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Planting and Care: Pacayas like to live in the shade, but will be tolerant of early morning or late afternoon sun. They like a fair amount of moisture on a regular basis and a slightly acid soil if they can get it.
Text and Photographs Copyrighted ©KO 2010

 
Peach Palm Bactis gasipaes
This is a palm used for palm hearts and for its extremely nutritious small fruits.
 
Pineapple Palm
We were told this lovely palm floated down the stream beside the hotel property and took root on the lakeside beach. Some years later lake waters rose and then rose some more until the fronds of this palm were floating. Once again it went traveling.
Benefits:
Photographed:
At the Hotel San Buenaventura on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Planting and Care:
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2010 & 2014

 

Photographed: At the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala in 2010.

**Ponytail Palm, Elephant's Foot Palm Nolina recurvata Hemsl. 
Benefits:
From: Mexico
Planting and Care:
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2012

Identification of my Mystery Plant #3 was helped along with the suggestion of a Twitter friend, Stanley B. from New York State. Many thanks.

 

Photographed: In the Palermo Botanical Garden in Sicily, Italy.

 

San José Hesper Palm Brahea Brandegeei
This beautiful palm will eventually reach 45 feet in height.
From: Mexico
Photographed: In the Botanical Garden in Naples, Italy.
Planting and Care: This is a dry climate palm so it is relatively easy to care for. Give it a place in full sun and some water and it will be off and running. It is more cold tolerant than many other palms, but not below 25 degrees F.

Text and Photographs Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2012
 
Travelers Palm Ravenala madagascariensis
Though not really a palm, the traveler is very appealing and looks more like a relative of the banana.
From: Madagascar
Photographed: In the Botanical Garden at the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Planting and Care: I would say the most important consideration with a travelers palm is can you provide a wind free place in the garden. When the wind hits this stunning plant its leaves become shredded and very unattractive. Plant it in any soil with good drainage in a sunny or bright semi shady spot and it will delight you. Its only other requirement is routine rainfall or watering.
Text and Photographs Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2012

 

Triangle Palm Dypsis decaryi (Jum.)
Growing to be about 45 feet tall, this peculiar palm has an almost perfectly triangular trunk. Probably for that quality, its ease of care and its visual appeal it has been exported to gardens around the world. It probably also has lost its native territory to population growth and encroachment and is now considered endangered.
Benefits:
From:
Madagascar rainforests
Photographed: In the Botanical Garden at the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala and finally identified in the Palermo Botanical Garden in Sicily.
Planting and Care: Given the nature of its native place, plant it in full sun and give it routine rainfall or watering. It can handle dry periods, but does not particularly like too much water.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©KO 2012 & ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014
 

Palm Tree Mystery #1
Photographed:
In Buenos Aires, Argentina.

 
Palm Tree Mystery #4
This is a peculiar and attractive small palm that seems at home growing here in the highlands of Guatemala. It has a trunk that starts off small and gets larger as it grows up as you can see in the photograph on the left.
Benefits:
Photographed:
At the Hotel Riviera on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Planting and Care:
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©KO 2010

 

I think this is similar to a Joey Palm, with the botanical name Licuala orbicularis

Palm Tree Mystery #5
Photographed: In the Jardin Botanique in Tahiti, 2012
Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013 

Palm Tree Mystery #5a
Photographed: In the Jardin Botanique in Tahiti, 2012
Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013

 

Palm Tree Mystery #6
Photographed: In the Jardin Botanique in Tahiti, 2012
Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013

Palm Tree Mystery #7
Photographed: In our garden at our former home in Montserrat in 2008.
Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014

 

Palm Tree Mystery #8
Photographed: In the Botanical Garden in Naples, Italy, in 2013.
Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013

 

Palm Tree Mystery #27
Photographed: At the Magdalena Hotel in Tobago in 2018
Photograph ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2018

 
Palm Tree Mystery #28
Photographed: At the Magdalena Hotel in Tobago in 2018
Photograph ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2018
 
**Umbrella Palm See the "U" Page -- UMBRELLA PALM
 

Yatay Palm
Benefits:
From:

Photographed: In the Carlos Thays Botanical Garden in Buenos Aires, Argentina.
Planting and Care:
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013

 
 
 
SAGOS & CYCADS

 

Bread Palm, Bread Tree, Kaffir Bread, Karoo Cycad Encephalartos lehmannii (Zamiaceae)
This is a large family of very appealing cycads, ranging in colors from bright green to blue gray green.
Benefits:
From:
S. Africa
Planting and Care: This is both a frost and drought tolerant cycad that grows in its native environment on sandstone slopes. Evidently it also likes well drained soil.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2012

An interesting link,

http://www.cycadpalm.com/encephalartos.html

Photographed:   In the city gardens in Malaga, Botanic Garden in Malaga, Spain, 2012.

 

Photographed:   In the Botanical Garden, Ortobotanico, in Naples, Italy, 2012.

Photographed:   In the Botanical Garden, Ortobotanico, in Naples, Italy, 2012.

 

Giant Dioon, Gum Palm Dioon spinulosum
In nature this beautiful plant will grow to be 50 feet tall. It has stiff fronds and sharp edges.
Benefits:
From:
Tropical Mexico
Photographed: In the Palermo Botanical Garden in Sicily, Italy.
Planting and Care: This plant thrives in rocky limestone forests in tropical Mexico where it prefers partial shade and wet well drained soil.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2012
 
**Jamaica Sago, Cardboard Palm, Scurfy Zamia, Cycad Zamia furfuracea
This plant is aptly named for its stiff cardboard like leaves, but it could as easily have a more charming name for its attractiveness. We first saw them growing in the gardens of the hotel where we were staying in Antigua in the West Indies. I came to a dead stop and fell in love. They are beautiful plants.
From: Mexico through northern South America
Planting and Care: This is a new plant in our garden and we'll have to see how it goes. According to one source, the Jamaica sago prefers an arid climate, but will do fine in one that is not if planted in a sunny area with good drainage. The second source recommended planting this sago in semi-shade and providing routine watering or rainfall to keep them happy. Update: So far we have to agree with the folks who recommended a dry setting.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©Krika.com 2008 and ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014\

Photographed: In the herb garden at our former home in Montserrat

Photographed: In Parque de la Leyendas, Lima, Peru, in 2013.

 
Natal Giant Cycad, Giant Tree Cycad Encephalartos natalensis
This is a long lived and slow growing cycad that will eventually reach a height of 20 feet with 10 foot fronds. Plants are either male or female so you'll need one of each if you plan to have more.
Benefits:
From:
South Africa
Photographed: In the Palermo Botanical Garden in Sicily, Italy.
Planting and Care: Surprisingly frost and drought tolerant, this cycad prefers to live in a bright semi shady area of the garden.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2012
 

Pineapple Zamia Lepidozamia peroffskyana Regel.
Benefits:
From:
Eastern Australia
Photographed: In the Palermo Botanical Garden in Sicily, Italy.
Planting and Care: This slow growing cycad prefers light shade, but will handle full sun as long as it gets very regular watering or rainfall. It is not frost hardy.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2012
 
Sago Palm Garden, Botanical Garden, Naples, Italy.
Photographs Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2012 and 2014
 

 

**Sago Palm, Gnu Palm, King Sago Palm Cycas revoluta
This sago is a squat, beautiful, dark-leaved very primitive plant and one of the oldest members of the cycad family. Sadly, in the winter of 2007 our sago died from the white scale infestation that was so destructive to these marvelous trees. We do not use toxic pesticides and our soap sprays were not adequate to kill the scale during the six months we were on island. In our absence the scale got a great leg up and we had no luck getting it back under control when we returned. Fortunately, we have a little one growing in our garden again now that we live in Guatemala.
Benefits: Ours didn't seem to give fruit, but the fruits are said to be very similar in flavor to coconuts and are eaten the same way.
From: Sagos are native to S. Japan. Also see the Mexican Cycad Dioon edule.
Planting and Care: The sago thrives in full sun, but it does just fine with some shade. It likes routine rainfall or watering.
Text & Photographs Copyrighted © KO 2005 and ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013.

Photographed: In our garden at our former home in Montserrat in 2005.

A Flowering Sego Palm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photographed: At the Hotel Regis in Panajachel at Lake Atitlan in Guatemala, in 2011.

Photographed: At the Hotel Regis in Panajachel at Lake Atitlan in Guatemala, in 2011.

 

Photographed: At the Hotel Regis in Panajachel at Lake Atitlan in Guatemala, in 2011.

 

Photographed: This photographs of a sago in bloom was taken in the city gardens in Malaga, Spain, in 2012.

 
 

 Click links to see our plants alphabetically listed by common name,
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Click here for a list of my Special Pages

   
or use
the search engine