-->
GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com
FERNS PAGE
 
 
Tour Our Destination Websites Taxco-Today.com Oaxaca-Today.com Montserrat-Today Site
See our silver designs at Krika.com Read our travel stories and other tales at Krika.com

Click below to see our plants alphabetically listed by common name with their cures and cooking ideas

 
 or, Search for Latin names and more here!

FERNS
Ferns are some of my very favorite plants. Their shapes, sizes, colors, textures and often real delicacy have always intrigued me. Below are two photographs I took while enthralled in the fern garden of the Orto Botanico or Botanical Garden in Naples, Italy in 2012, 2013 and 2014.
 
 
 
Bird's Nest Fern Asplenium nidus and syn. Asplenium antiquum, Asplenium australiasicum, Asplenium filicifolium, Asplenium pachyphyllum
These are one of my very favorite ferns. At our former home in Montserrat, I was given a tiny one, but we sold the home and garden not long after so I never did feel like I had made a new fern relationship. There are many varieties of this plant with fronds that are medium sized to large as you can see in the photographs below.
Benefits: The bird's nest fern has been used as a curative in folk medicine for a variety of ailments.
From:
Pacific tropical areas in Asia and to islands in that area like Australia and all the way to Hawaii.
Planting and Care: Asplenium nidus thrives in warm, humid areas in partial to full shade. It is not comfortable when temperatures fall below 50° F.
Text and Photographs ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013/2018
To the left the Bird's Nest Fern with Spores was Photographed: In Parque de la Leyendas, Lima, Peru, in 2013. The fern to the right was photographed in the Royal Botanical Garden in Sydney, Australia in 2013.

Photographed: At the Roger Williams Park Botanical Center in Rhode Island in 2013.

Blue Star Fern, Golden Polypody, Golden Serpent Fern, Cabbage Palm Fern, Gold-Foot Fern, Hare-Foot Fern Phlebodium aureum
This beautiful large fern offers other garden benefits as well as its beauty. Its color is unusual and by and large it is easy to grow. At its best it will be about three feet wide and just as tall.
Benefits: Phlebodium aureum has long been used as a staple in Central American traditional medicine and in more modern times many studies have been done to examine and validate its curative qualities.
From:
The eastern side of the warm climate Americas.
Photographed: At the Blithewold Mansion, Gardens and Arboretum, in Bristol, Rhode Island, USA in 2014.
Planting and Care: Plant in a bright shady area of the garden and remember to water just as the soil is becoming dry. It likes a bit of fertilizer every month during the growing season. It is not at all cold hardy.
Text and Photograph ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2015/2018

With my gratitude, my fern mystery #2 was identified by Amy, a visitor to the site.

Boston Fern -- Please see Sword Fern below on this page

Brazilian Dwarf Tree Fern, Red Brazilian Tree Fern, Red Dwarf Tree Fern Blechnum brasiliense
Benefits: I haven't yet found any curative or dietary benefits.
From:
Peru and Brazil in areas with warm and humid subtropical climates.
Photographed: In the Royal Botanic Garden in Sydney, Australia, in 2013.
Planting and Care: This beautiful plant is not at all tolerant of cold weather and in temperate climates it is restricted to a life indoors. As you can see in the photograph its young leaves emerge first with a deep rosy red growing green as they mature. It is a relatively large fern with mature fronds extending to about to about 45 inches. It likes to be planted in rich, moist, well-drained loam with a pH that is neutral or slightly acidic. It prefers to be in semi-shade in a site protected from strong winds.
Text and Photograph ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013/2018

This beautiful fern was identified by Pat B. a very helpful visitor to my website. Thanks Pat.

Chilean Hard Fern, Seersucker Fern, South American Seersucker Blechnum chilense syn. B. cordatum, B. magellanicum
This beauty can have fronds 5 feet long. It is said to be a plant that will grow reasonably well in poor conditions, but when given the best it is a stellar performer.
Benefits: I have yet to find any medicinal or dietary benefits, but it is an especially beautiful fern.
From: Native primarily to Chile, but also found in Argentina
Photographed: In the Winter Garden in Auckland, New Zealand, in 2013
Planting and Care: Growing well in semi-shade or full shade, this fern is hardy in frost conditions and even freezing conditions. As with most ferns it prefers a rich, loamy, moist and well drained soil and humidity. In its case, a slightly acidic soil is more desirable.
Text and Photograph ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014/2019


With my appreciation, this fern which was a mystery to me was identified by a new visitor to the site, Sharon from Denver, Colorado, in the USA

 
Chinese Brake, Chinese Ladder Brake, Ladder Fern Pteris vittata
This beauty needs some room to show itself off and that it does.
Benefits: This is a very environmentally advantageous plant as it absorbs arsenic from tainted soil. It is even called a "hyperacumulator."
From:
Tropical areas of Asia, Africa and Australia
Photographed: In Parque de la Leyendas, Lima, Peru, in 2013.
Planting and Care: Chinese brake favors moist well-drained soil that has a limestone base and it prefers growing in shade.
Text and Photograph ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014/2018
 
Crested Wood Fern, Crested Buckler-Fern, Narrow Swamp Fern Dryopteris cristata
Benefits: This is a a good choice for folks having problems with deer in their gardens as deer don't seem to like it. It also has medicinal benefits which seems unusual in a fern.
From: North American wetlands
Photographed: Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens, Boothbay Maine, 2013.
Planting and Care: This is an evergreen fern that will grow to be anywhere from 1 to 3 feet in height. It prefers to be settled into a shady garden where the soil is moist year round.
Text and Photograph ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013/2019
 
Cretan Brake Fern, Table Fern, Ribbon Fern Pteris cretica
This is the perfect small fern to brighten up a shady area of your garden. 
Benefits:
From:
Europe, Asia and Africa
Photographed: In Parque de la Leyendas, Lima, Peru, in 2013.
Planting and Care: This is a sub tropical fern so it will not handle freezing temperatures. It will grow to be about 1 to 2 feet wide and tall. It likes bright light and a slightly alkaline well-drained soil.
Text and Photograph ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014/2019
 
**Deer's Foot Fern Davallia family
This is one of my favorite ferns and I seem destined to have one. I got my first while living in New England so it occupied most of one of my large sunny windows. And, many years later while driving on one of the very narrow old roads in the north of Montserrat, there they were hanging from the moist shady wild side of the mountain. I confess to stopping the car and adopting one. It is now living well in our shady terraced garden as you can see in the photograph to the left below.
Benefits:
From:
Fiji
Photographed:
Below on the left in our shady terrace garden at our former home in Montserrat. Below on the right in Parque de la Leyendas, Lima, Peru, in 2013.
Planting and Care:
These ferns make excellent easy to care for houseplants that will give an exotic air to any room, but keep in mind that the fronds from a hanging pot can be more than a yard long. Give them bright light and regular watering when the soil feels dry and they will be just fine. Outdoors they do well in just the same situation.
Text and Photographs ©Krika.com 2008 and GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2019
 
Dwarf Tree Fern, Silver Lady Blechnum gibbum
The silver lady is a fast grower and will reach its normal mature height of 5 or 6 feet in no time at all. It appearance it is much like a tree fern, but of a size that makes it more adaptable in smaller gardens.
Benefits: I didn't find any information on this yet.
From:
Fiji
Photographed:   In the Botanic Garden in Wellington, New Zealand, 2013
Planting and Care: This fern is intolerant of frost and seems to be pretty picky about water. Too little or too much will have very unhappy results. It is also intolerant of lime so you will need to acidify its water with a little lemon juice. In tropical or warm climates, plant it in the shade in moist well-drained slightly acidic soil with lots of organic material.
Text and Photograph ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013/2019
 
Emerald Fern See Below -- Fox Tail Fern
**Fish Tail Fern, Fish Tail Sword Fern, Weeping Sword Fern Nephrolepis falcata furcans, syn's Nephrolepis biserrata var. furcans, Nephrolepis gibbosum, Nephrolepis gibbosa, Nephrolepis biserratum var. furcans, Nephrolepis biserrata 'Furcans', Nephrolepis falcata, Nephrolepis biserrata var. furcans, Nephrolepis falcata f. furcans
This is one of my all time favorite ferns. Its color is wonderful and as you can see in the photographs it has an exuberant amount of fronds when it is happy. Under the right conditions it spreads rapidly, enough so I had to routinely pull plants to give to neighbors or we would have been overrun.
Benefits:
I didn't find anything yet.
From:
Myanmar, Vietnam, Philippines, Indonesia, New Guinea
Photographed:
In our shady terrace garden at our former home in Montserrat.
Planting and Care: The tropical fish tail is not particularly fond of mid-day Caribbean sun, though morning or afternoon sun is tolerated pretty well. It is most fond of bright sun-free spaces. It also loves a bit of water as do almost all ferns, but it survived the 2007 months long heat wave and drought in Montserrat while we were away.
Text & Photographs ©KO 2007/2010 and GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2019
**Fish-Tail Fern (2), Fishtail Strap Fern, Climbing Bird's Nest Fern, Terrestrial Elkhorn Fern, Crested Fern, Fishtail Strap Fern, Climbing Bird's Nest Fern, Dwarf Elkhorn Fern Polypodium punctatum 'Grandiceps'
For years I was calling this a "lettuce fern" in my inimitable way of casually naming things. There was one growing in the garden in Montserrat when we moved into our new home there and I had no idea what it was. At that time, here is what I wrote, "Lettuce Fern: Lost to the volcanic eruption 7/03. This is a peculiar fern looking like an underwater plant. It has a very delicate appearance, but the leaves are quite tough."
Much later I wrote this. "We later had two large and thriving elkhorns living in our shady terraced garden. Elkhorns like to be planted in a relatively protected environment and when happy each plant will be three feet high and three feet wide.
My off the cuff remarks about the first plant we had were not far off the mark; elkhorns really do look like underwater plants."
Benefits: I haven't yet found any.
From:
Australia
Photographed: In our shady terrace garden at our former home in Montserrat.
Planting and Care: Fish-Tail ferns, like many other ferns, prefer a bright shady place in the garden where there is good soil and moisture. It will do well in mildly acidic or alkaline soils. I've grown it in the Caribbean in relatively deep shade and in very bright shade in the Guatemalan highlands. In each place this fern has done well. Sadly, it is a relatively slow grower.
Text and Photograph ©Krika.com 2008 and GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013/2014/2019
 
Fox Tail Fern, Emerald Fern, Sprenger's Asparagus Fern Protasparagus densiflorus syn. Asparagus densiflorus
Not until I saw this fern growing in Rhode Island did I really see its potential. It makes a splendid ground cover underneath sizeable trees where lower growing ground covers would be dwarfed.

Benefits:
From:
Temperate areas of Southern Africa
Photographed:
At the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala in 2010 unless otherwise noted.
Planting and Care:
This is one of those wonderfully hardy ferns that can handle life in full sun though it will also do fine in semi shady areas of the garden. Almost unbelievably it is also tolerant of its access to water, doing fine with routine rainfall or watering, but putting up with less if it has to.
Text & Photographs ©KO 2010 and GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014
Photographed: To the left in a city street garden in Malaga, Spain, in 2012. On the right at the Roger Williams Park Botanical Center in Rhode Island in 2013.
 
Hayscented Fern, Eastern Hayscented Fern Dennstaedtia punctilobula
This hardy fern produces a fresh mown hay scent when its leaves are brushed by a hand, hence its name.
Benefits: This is one plant deer don't like to eat.
From:
Eastern North America as far north as New Foundland, south to northern Alabama and west to Arkansas and Wisconsin
Photographed: In the Thuya Garden, Mt. Desert Island, Maine, 2013.
Planting and Care: It prefers damp acidic soils in woods or fields. With some attention given, this fern will be very pleasing as you can see in the photograph. It prefers shade or shade with morning or late afternoon sun. It is tolerant of almost any soil and in most areas it will probably do well with rainfall or occasional watering. This could make an excellent ground cover as it grows only to about 2 feet in height. Mix in some wildflower seeds and it will be just lovely.
Text and Photograph ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013/2019
 
**Holly Fern, Japanese Holly Fern Cyrtomium falcatum
I had one of these as a houseplant in Washington, DC, where I lived for several years. It never disappointed me in any way; it was always green and healthy. For a fern it is especially tough looking with thick leathery leaves. I was thrilled to see one growing outside.
Benefits: I haven't read anything about the holly fern, except for its appealing attributes in the garden.
From: Asia, India, southern Africa and Hawaii
Photographed:
In the Botanical Garden at Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala on the left. On the right in the fern garden at the Naples, Italy, Botanical Garden.
Planting and Care: As with all ferns it is most practical to buy plants or get some from friends. Sometimes you'll be lucky and have a volunteer if there are some in your neighborhood. Plant them in a shady place, even in deep shade, and make sure they don't get too dry. When mature, the fronds will reach up to 2 feet in length.
Text & Photographs ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014/2019
 

Japanese Painted Fern, Oriental Lady Fern Athyrium niponicum var. pictum, and syn's Asplenium niponicum, Asplenium uropteron, Athyrium uropteron, Athyrium goeringianum
This is a small decorative fern with fronds growing only about 18 inches long. They can have a green and white mix of colors or there can be a purple tinge to the fronds as well.
Benefits: This lovely fern is resistant to deer.
From:
Japan, North China, Korea and Taiwan
Photographed: To the left and below on the right in Thuya Garden, on Mt. Desert Island in Maine, in 2013. Below on the left in the Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens, Boothbay Maine, 2013.
Planting and Care: Plant these small ferns perhaps as a border to a more shady part of your garden. They prefer a humous rich and evenly moist soil and grow well in a temperate climate. Surprisingly they are drought tolerant once they have settled in.
Text and Photograph ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014/2019

With my appreciation, my error in identification of these ferns was corrected by a visitor to the site, Sharon from Denver, Colorado, in the USA, Many thanks, Kathleen

 

Northern Lady Fern Athyrium angustum (Willd.) C. Presl
Benefits: I haven't found any as yet.
From:
Native to northeastern North America
Photographed: In the Jardin Botanique in Tahiti
, in 2013.
Planting and Care: These ferns are native to New England's moist woods, wet meadows, swamps, and floodplains, but as you can see to the right they will adapt to tropical environments as well. This fern is easy to grow. Plant it in fertile well-drained soil in bright shade or in an area of the garden where it may receive only morning or late afternoon sun. At maturity they will reach a height somewhere between 2 and 3 feet.
Text and Photograph ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014/2019

With my appreciation, my Mystery Fern #6 was identified by a valued visitor to the site, Sharon from Denver, Colorado, in the USA.
Many thanks, Kathleen

 

Leather Leaf Fern, Leather Fern, Leathery Shieldfern, Iron Fern, 7-Weeks-Fern, Climbing Shield Fern, Rumohra (polystichum) adiantiformis
This is a stunning new fern that arrived in our garden on the wind in the garden at our former home in Montserrat. We found it growing well right beside the house in full sun though it is said to prefer a more shady spot. Its fronds have a bronze like tinge of color and grow to be about two feet. It seems a very sturdy type of fern.
Benefits: Fronds of this sturdy fern are often used as contrasts in floral bouquets.
From: The leather leaf fern is pretty much native to the entire world
from such diverse places as South America, Southern Africa, the Caribbean, and Papua New Guinea.
Planting and Care: Leather leaf ferns require partial or full shade in a tropical climate. They also require an evenly moist acidic soil though they are not fussy about what type of soil it is.
Text ©KO 2007 and ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com

 
Long Brake, Elephantleaf Brake Pteris grandifolia
This is a beautiful fern which will be exuberant given the right conditions. When mature its fronds can reach lengths of from about 3 feet to 15 feet.
Benefits: I haven't found anything yet.
From:
Subtropical and tropical areas of the world.
Photographed: In Parque de la Leyendas, Lima, Peru, in 2013.
Planting and Care: As you can see in the photographs, long brake can handle some very hot sun. It likes to grow on moist rocky slopes.
Note: I found very little information on this fern which is disappointing as it is stunning. If you have any information on it, I'd love to hear from you.
Text and Photograph ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014/2019
 
MAIDENHAIR FERNS
Double-Edge Maidenhair Adiantum anceps
This is a beautiful warm climate fern with delicate somehow graceful fronds. I would like one in my garden.
Benefits:
From:
Bolivia; Colombia; Ecuador; Peru
Photographed: To the right In the Royal Botanic Garden in Sydney, Australia, in 2013 and below in the Jardin Botanique in Tahiti, also in 2013.
Planting and Care:
It was impossible to get any information on how to grow this enchanting plant, but from the photographs I would say rich soil, shade and moisture are the keys to success.
Text and Photograph ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2015

 

 
**Maidenhair Fern Adiantum raddianum
In New England I always had a pot of these lovely ferns growing happily on a northerly facing window ledge. What was so delightful in the Caribbean was seeing this delicate plant growing happily along the roadside. They are said to be difficult to transplant successfully, but I did not find that to be so.
Benefits:
From:
Photographed: Below on the left in our shady terrace garden at our former home in Montserrat. Below on the right in
Parque de la Leyendas, Lima, Peru, in 2013.
Planting and Care:

Text and Photographs ©Krika.com 2008 and GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014

Photographed: In the Botanical Garden in Naples, Italy, in 2012.

 

Ming Fern, Zigzag Shrub, Pom Pom Asparagus Fern Asparagus macowanii
The perennial ming fern appears very delicate, but it will grow to be almost six feet tall. Like its cousins, the other asparagus ferns, it is one of my favorites.
Benefits:
From:
New Zealand
Photographed: At the Winter Garden in Auckland, New Zealand, 2013
Planting and Care: In a warm climate garden plant the ming fern in fertile soil in a place that is shady in mid day or brightly lit with little direct sun. It is not winter hardy.
Text and Photograph ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014

 

My Fern Mystery #2 was solved with the help of a visitor to the site, Sharon, from Denver, Colorado, in the USA
Many thanks,
Kathleen

**Rabbits Foot Fern Davallia fejeensis
This is one of my long term favorites -- a large wide lacy fern frond growing on a furry foot.
Benefits:
From:
The Canary Islands
Planting and Care: This is one of those ferns that grows on a thick (1/2") stem that grows on the ground when they are in their natural tropical habitat. In more northerly climates, it is an indoor plant almost always potted as a hanging plant with the feet growing over the edge of the pot until it is almost covered. Often they are planted in wire baskets to be hung on terraces in the summer, but these are hard to care for when brought inside in the fall. They will not winter over outside in a northern climate. In our Caribbean garden we planted ours in our shady terrace garden where it did very well. It proved pretty hardy, having survived a four month drought while we were away one year.
Text and Photographs ©Krika.com 2008 and GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014

Photographed: In our shady terrace garden at our former home in Montserrat.

Photographed: In the Royal Botanic Garden in Sydney, Australia, in 2013.

Photographed: In the Winter Garden in Auckland, New Zealand, in 2013.

**Squirrel's Foot Fern Davallia trichomanoides or Davillia mariensii
This was a wonderful and unfamiliar addition to our "footed" fern garden at our former home in Montserrat and it brought its own wonderfully different characteristics to the others. Its fronds are attractive, but relatively short, only about a foot in length. Overall the plant seems extremely hardy having been off and running just a few days after being planted.
Benefits:
From:
Fiji
Photographed: Below on the left in our shady terrace garden at our former home in Montserrat and on the right in Cartagena, Columbia.
Planting and Care: Grow this fern in a semi shady or a deeply shaded area of your garden and it will thrive. As with most ferns, a moist but not wet soil will be appreciated.
Text and Photograph ©Krika.com 2008 and ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013
 
STAG HORN FERNS
**Stag Horn Fern (1) Platycerium superbum
This is a very exotic looking fern that attaches itself to and grows on trees. We were given one a few years ago and planted it in the perfect spot on the neem tree in our shady terraced hill garden. It had three tiny leaves back then and though we tended it carefully, it didn't die, but it never grew. Then one day my husband had an epiphany -- nothing will grow on a neem tree. We moved the fern to a different tree and it was growing happily adding new leaves each week.
From: Australia
  Planting and Care: If you are lucky enough to get one of these ferns, find a bright semi shady tree (not a neem) and attach your plant to the tree with cotton twine or with two inch torn strips of cotton cloth. Give the tiny fern a daily dose of water and a weekly dose of a liquid fertilizer. You will be as thrilled as I am every time you see a tiny new leaf and a flat round circular green attachment to the tree.
Text and Photographs ©Krika.com 2008
Photographed: On the left in our shady terrace garden at our former home in Montserrat and on the right at a friend's home also on the island.

Stag Horn Fern (2) Platycerium holttumii
This is a huge and stunning stag horn that probably takes more care than most of us have time for.
Benefits:
From:
Southeast Asia and Malaysia
Photographed: At the Botanic Garden, Wellington, New Zealand
, in 2013.
Planting and Care: More difficult to grow than some other stag horns, this one prefers bright light, warm temperatures and breezes of fresh air.
Text and Photograph ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2015

This Fern Mystery was solved with the help of a new visitor to the site, Sharon from Denver, Colorado, in the USA
Many thanks,
Kathleen

Photographed: At the Botanic Garden in Sydney, Australia, in 2013.

Staghorn Fern (3)
Benefits:
From:

Photographed: At the Botanic Garden in Sydney, Australia, in 2013.

Planting and Care:
Text and Photograph ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014

This Fern Mystery was solved with the help of a new visitor to the site, Sharon from Denver, Colorado, in the USA
Many thanks,
Kathleen

Port Jackson Stag Horn Fern Platycerium alcione
This narrow leaved stag horn has few entries in Google and the photos for this entry are mostly totally unrelated flowers. It's a shame because it is an interesting plant and I would have liked to learn more.
Benefits:
From:

Photographed: In the Botanical Garden in Naples, Italy, in 2014.
Planting and Care:
Text and Photograph ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2015
 

**Sword Fern, Wild Boston Fern, Macho Fern, Boston Sword Fern, Boston Fern, Boston Blue Bell Fern, Tuber Ladder Fern, Fishbone Fern Nephrolepis exaltata
This is one of the most popular ferns I can imagine, one of the easiest to care for and one of my genuine favorites. I've had them since I was in college in Boston many years ago. Its two foot fronds are a deep lovely green and when planted in a hanging pot or in a pot that is set on a stand, there are few plants that are so elegant .I have enjoyed having large hanging baskets of this fern in Boston and in the spring-like climate of Taxco, Mexico. I always called it a Boston Fern, but when I found it growing in the hot sunny garden of our new home in Montserrat, I thought it had to be something different. Their differences lie in the conditions under which they will grow and thrive.
Benefits: Nephrolepis exaltata or sword fern is one of those plants useful in clearing the air in your home of formaldehyde.
Photographed:
In our shady terrace garden at our former home in Montserrat.
Planting and Care: The sword fern will grow happily in shade or in full tropical sun as long as there is regular rainfall or watering. We have had plants with fronds that are almost three feet in length though this seems to be the happiest end of the spectrum. Normally, with little or no care the fronds will be about twenty inches or so. They do like a very occasional dose of fertilizer, but seem indifferent to the type of soil in which they are planted. In Montserrat almost all soil is acidic. The fronds do not particularly like being touched so try to put the plant out of the way of human or animal contact in a semi-sunny location. Water it when just dry and and fertilize it occasionally. It is even able to withstand long periods of drought, though its appearance does suffer. As an indoor plant it will greatly appreciate being misted with water occasionally.
Text & Photograph ©KO 2007/2011 and GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2018

**Tattoo Fern
This lovely lacey fern showed up in our garden this year all on its own and it seemed to have found its own sort of eden as it flourished and spread rapidly. One afternoon visiting a friend in her garden I was told of this fern's local life. For the children of Montserrat in days gone by this fern provided free, instant and very decorative tattoos as you can see in the photograph below on the right.
  Planting and Care: As this fern was a volunteer in a sunny place in our garden I'd have to say it would do well there, but it would have to be given regular rainfall or watering to be at its best. It is a much more delicate plant than the sword fern or many of the other long fronded varieties we have in the garden.
Text & Photographs ©Krika.com 2008
Photographed: At a friend's home in Woodlands, Montserrat.
 
TREE FERNS

**Tree Fern Cyathea arborea (L.) J. E. Smith or Cyathea dealbata or Asparagus virgatus or Schizolobium Parahyba (from Brazil) or Dicksonia fibrosa
These enchanting wonders will grow to a height of 20 to 30 feet given the right conditions.
From: The Dutch East Indies.
Planting and Care: Tree ferns are always said to be shade loving, but I most consistently see them growing in full sun as you see in the photograph to the left. They are also said to love moisture and a damp humus rich soil. I don't yet have personal experience with growing one though I hope to change that soon. They are exquisite plants.
Text and Photographs ©KO 2007/2010

 

Photographed: At Rancho Grande Inn in Panajachel on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.

Photographed: In the Botanical Garden at the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.

 

Photographed: In the Botanical Garden at the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.

Photographed: In the Botanical Garden at the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.

 

Photographed: In the Ortobotanico (Botanical Garden) in Naples, Italy, in 2014.

Photographed: In the Botanical Garden at the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.

 
 
LANDSCAPING WITH FERNS
 

Soften the base of a fence, wall or foundation with a row of ferns.
Photographed: In the Thuya Garden on Mt. Desert Island, Maine, 2013

 

Create the feeling of a tropical forest with an abundance of different ferns and small palms.
Photographed: In the (Ortobotanico) Botanical Garden in Naples, Italy, in 2014.

 

Create a very beneficial feng shui water feature embedded in a fern garden.
Photographed: In the (Ortobotanico) Botanical Garden in Naples, Italy, in 2014.

Shelter a small reflecting koi pond with overhanging ferns.
Photographed: In the (Ortobotanico) Botanical Garden in Naples, Italy, in 2014.

Never forget the benefits of layering ferns especially those with similarly shaped fronds.
Photographed: In the (Ortobotanico) Botanical Garden in Naples, Italy, in 2014.

 

Asplenum bulbiterum

 
 
FERN MYSTERIES

If You Know What This Fern Is, Please Contact Me
#1 Fern Mystery
Photographed:
At Fernz Fernery at the Winter Garden in Auckland, New Zealand, 2013
.

With my gratitude, my fern mystery #2 was identified by Amy, a visitor to the site.

 

If You Know What This Fern Is, Please Contact Me
#3a Fern Mystery
Photographed:
At the Winter Garden in Auckland, New Zealand
, 2013

If You Know What This Fern Is, Please Contact Me
#4a Fern Mystery
Photographed:
At the Winter Garden in Auckland, New Zealand, 2013

My Fern Mysteries #5, 5a 6a and 10 were solved with the help of a new visitor to the site, Sharon from Denver, Colorado, in the USA
Many thanks, Kathleen
 

If You Know What This Fern Is, Please Contact Me
#6 Fern Mystery
Photographed:
In Thuya Garden, on Mt. Desert Island in Maine, 2013

With my appreciation, this mystery was tentatively identified by Peter from Auckland, New Zealand, as a Pneumatopteris pennigera. What do you think?

 

My #7 Fern Mystery was identified by Pat B. a helpful and knowledgeable visitor to my website. Thanks Pat.

If You Know What This Fern Is, Please Contact Me
#8 Fern Mystery
Photographed:
In Thuya Garden, on Mt. Desert Island in Maine, 2013.

 
 If You Know What This Fern Is, Please Contact Me
#9 Fern Mystery
Photographed:
In Thuya Garden, on Mt. Desert Island in Maine, 2013

Could this be a Crested Wood Fern as pictured above in #6?
 If You Know What This Fern Is, Please Contact Me
#9a Fern Mystery
Photographed:
In the Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens, Boothbay Maine, 2013.

 

 

If You Know What This Fern Is, Please Contact Me
#12 Fern Mystery
Photographed:
In our shady terrace garden at our former home in Montserrat.
Text & Photograph ©KO 2009

 

If You Know What This Fern Is, Please Contact Me
#13 Fern Mystery
Hint:
This fern we have dubbed, tattoo fern, but surely that can't be right.
Photographed: In our border garden at our former home in Montserrat.
Text & Photograph ©Krika.com 2008

If You Know What This Fern Is, Please Contact Me
#13A Fern Mystery
Photographed:
In our shady terrace garden at our former home in Montserrat.
Text & Photograph ©Krika.com 2008

 

If You Know What This Fern Is, Please Contact Me
#20 Fern Mystery
Hint:
This may be a Christella harveyi or perhaps a Blechnum chilense
Photographed: In the Botanical Garden at the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Text & Photograph ©KO 2010

 
 

 Click links to see our plants alphabetically listed by common name,
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Click here for a list of my Special Pages

   
or use
the search engine