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DAISIES
 

Painted Daisy Chrysanthemum carinatum
These are delightful plants that will bloom all summer giving bright color to a border garden.
Benefits:
From:
Northern Africa
Photographed: In the Blithewold Garden in Bristol, Rhode Island, in 2013.
Planting and Care: Grow painted daisies in fertile, well-drained, moist but not wet soil in full sun. Probably in hot climates it would work better to have them enjoy morning sun, but not the hot afternoon sun and heat.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014

With my appreciation this plant mystery was solved by Jac from North Norfolk, England

 
Shasta Daisy Leucanthemum X superbum 'Becky'
Benefits:
From:

Photographed:
In the Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens, Boothbay, Maine, 2013.
Planting and Care:
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013
 

African Daisy, South African Daisy, Cape Daisy, Blue-Eyed Daisy Osteospermum
Benefits:
From:
Africa
Photographed: At Ericlea Minoa in Sicily, Italy, in 2012.
Planting and Care: This is a warm climate daisy liking it warm and sunny. It likes a rich well draining soil, but does pretty well in poor soils as well. When well cared for they will bloom all summer in cooler climates, but they won't make it through winter.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014

With my appreciation this mystery plant was solved by Jac from North Norfolk, England

 
 

Dandelions Taraxacum californicum
These are the pretty, but dreaded, lawn weeds that are an excuse for using terribly toxic weed killers. On the plus side, the entire plant is edible and packs powerful health improving benefits. Try it in salads or cooked with other greens.
Benefits: In more earth friendly places, dandelions are used as medicinal plants to lower blood pressure, to improve the look of your skin.
From:
Europe and Asia
Photographed:

Text Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014

 

Dasheen Colocasia esculenta
Loving water and growing well in full sun or semi shade, dasheen is related to the elephant ear, but is tougher in dealing with the Caribbean sun. Elephant ear plants look terrible in the full sun of late spring and early summer while dasheen does just fine.
Text Copyrighted ©KO 2007

 
David Verity Cigar Plant Cuphea x 'David Verity'
Benefits: This terribly named plant is a hummingbird and butterfly attractant.
Photographed: In the Botanical Garden at the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Planting and Care: Give this sweet little perennial plant full sun and routine rainfall or watering and you'll have its pretty flowers to enjoy for months each year.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©KO 2010

Photographed: In the Botanical Garden at the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.

Photographed: In the Blithewold Garden in Bristol, Rhode Island 2013.

 
 
DAYLILIES
 

Photographed: In our garden at Lake Atitlan in Guatemala. This photograph was an accident and I am ever grateful when I make these "mistakes." 

Daylily, Day Lilies Hemerocallis
"This large family of wonderful flowering perennials prefers a little shade from the hot mid-day sun. We don't yet have any in Montserrat, but they are definitely on the shopping list when next we get to Florida." I wrote that back in 2007 and only in the spring of 2010 was I able to garner any seeds for these lovely old standbys.
Benefits: Apparently all parts of the plant are edible, though the flower is most likely to find itself in the cook pot.
From: The Pacific
Planting and Care: Full sun and routine rainfall or watering will keep these plants thriving and in bloom. Once well established, they are even a bit tolerant of drought and high heat although it will probably lessen the number of blooms on each plant.
Text and Photographs Copyrighted ©KO 2010 and GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014

"Daylily is the common name for blooming plants which belong to the genus Hemerocallis. The flowers of the plant are diverse in color and form, due to continuous efforts by gardening enthusiasts and horticulturalists to create new hybridized forms."
Contributed by Sharon from Denver, Colorado.
Many thanks,
Kathleen

 

Daylily 'August Flame' Hemerocallis
Photographed: In the Thuya Garden, Mt. Desert Island, Maine, 2013.

Daylily 'Green Eyes Wink' Hemerocallis
Photographed:
In the Thuya Garden, Mt. Desert Island, Maine, 2013.

Daylily 'Joan Senior' Hemerocallis
Photographed:
In the Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens, Boothbay, Maine, 2013.

Daylily 'Strawberry Candy' Hemerocallis
Photographed:
In the Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens, Boothbay, Maine, 2013.

 

Daylily 'Confectioner's Dream' Hemerocallis
Photographed:
In the Thuya Garden, Mt. Desert Island, Maine, 2013.
With my appreciation, this daylily was identified by a new visitor to the site, Sharon from Denver, Colorado.
Many thanks,
Kathleen

Orange Daylily Hemerocallis fulva
Photographed:
In the Hotel Regis garden at Lake Atitlan in Guatemala, 2012.
With my appreciation, this daylily was identified by a new visitor to the site, Sharon from Denver, Colorado.
Many thanks,
Kathleen

Orange Daylily Hemerocallis fulva
Photographed: In our garden at Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
With my appreciation, this daylily was identified by a new visitor to the site, Sharon from Denver, Colorado.
Many thanks,

Kathleen

Jersey Spider Daylily
Photographed: In the Hotel Regis garden at Lake Atitlan in Guatemala, 2012.
With my appreciation, this daylily was identified by a new visitor to the site, Sharon from Denver, Colorado.
Many thanks,
Kathleen

Orange Daylily Hemerocallis fulva
Photographed: In our garden at Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
With my appreciation, this daylily was identified by a new visitor to the site, Sharon from Denver, Colorado.
Many thanks,
Kathleen

 

Red Rum Daylily Hemerocallis
Photographed: In the Hotel Regis garden at Lake Atitlan in Guatemala, 2012.
With my appreciation, this daylily was identified by a new visitor to the site, Sharon from Denver, Colorado, in the USA
Many thanks,
Kathleen

 

Yellow Daylily Hemerocallis
Photographed: Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens, Boothbay Maine, 2013.
With my appreciation, this daylily was identified by a new visitor to the site, Sharon from Denver, Colorado, in the USA
Many thanks,
Kathleen

 

Radiation Biohazard Daylily Hemerocallis
Photographed: In the Hotel Regis garden at Lake Atitlan in Guatemala, 2012.
With my appreciation, this daylily was identified by a new visitor to the site, Sharon from Denver, Colorado.
Many thanks,
Kathleen

Ice Carnival Daylily Hemerocallis
Photographed:
At the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
With my appreciation, this daylily was identified by a new visitor to the site, Sharon from Denver, Colorado.
Many thanks,
Kathleen

 

White Daylily 1 Hemerocallis fulva
Photographed: In Bar Harbor, Maine, in the summer of 2013.
With my appreciation, this daylily was identified by a new visitor to the site, Sharon from Denver, Colorado.
Many thanks,
Kathleen

 

White Daylily 1a Hemerocallis fulva
Photographed: In Bar Harbor, Maine, in the summer of 2013.
With my appreciation, this daylily was identified by a new visitor to the site, Sharon from Denver, Colorado.
Many thanks,
Kathleen

Yellow Daylilies
Photographed:
At the Roger Williams Park Botanical Center in Rhode Island in 2013.

 
 
 
Desert Cabbage See The "K" Page Kalanchoe
 

**Desert Rose, Adenium Adenium obesum or Adenium arabicum
In appearance the desert rose seems to be a member of the frangipani family.
From: The Middle East
Photographed: On the tiled entryway to our former home in Montserrat and below in our deck garden.
Planting and Care: Plant it in the sun and keep this plant relatively dry or the results will be very disappointing. When well cared for it will grow to be about five feet tall with its branches spreading to be about four feet wide.
Text & Photographs Copyrighted ©Krika.com 2007/2009
 

 

**Devil's Ivy See The "P" Page POTHOS

 
 
 
 

**Devil's Twine See The "L" Page LOVE VINE

**Dhal See the "P" Page -- PIGEON PEA
 

**Dianthus
To me, these have always been tiny carnations. They were in my garden as a young child and each year I looked forward with joy when they began blooming. I think we called them "pinks" at the time.
Benefits:
From:

Photographed: In Ushuaia, Patagonia, Argentina, in the Botanical Garden at the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala and at the bottom in the Thuya Garden on Mt. Desert Island, Maine 2013.
Planting and Care: These are extremely easy to grow perennials. Get little plants at your local garden shop in the spring. Pick a place in the sun in your garden if you are in a northern climate and one with mid-day shade if you are in a hot climate and set them in. Give them routine watering or rainfall to keep them happy.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013

Flower Mysteries solved
by my friend Ursula G. living in Southern Germany

 

 

Dianthus 'Lavender Elegance' 1
Photographed: In Thuya Garden on Mt. Desert Island in Maine, 2013

 

Dianthus 'Lavender Elegance' 2
Photographed: In Thuya Garden on Mt. Desert Island in Maine, 2013

 
**Dieffenbachia, Dumb Cane Leafy Plant Dieffenbachia seguine (Jacq.)
This is another one of the many poisonous plants common in the Caribbean. We have three of them growing in our shady terraced garden.
From: Tropical America
Photographed: On the left in our terrace garden at our former home in Montserrat and on the right in the Botanical Garden at the Hotel Atitlan in Guatemala.
Planting and Care: Dieffenbachias are popular house plants in northern climates especially in public buildings as they tolerate low light very well and all in all require little care. Planted in a tropical setting keep them out of the mid day sun. They will do best in a bright shady area where they will receive routine rainfall or watering.
Text and Photographs Copyrighted ©KO 2008/2010

 Digitalis -- See Foxglove on the F page
**Dill Anethum graveolens
Dill is an annual herb which needs to be refreshed in the garden more than many of our old standbys. Fresh dill is used in making dill and kosher dill pickles and in flavoring salads and more. Walk through your garden brushing your dill plants with your hand as you pass and simply refresh yourself with the aroma.
Benefits: Dill is said to be helpful in reducing your heart rate and I have personally found this to be true. Talk with your physician before depending on dill to help you.
Photographed: In our latest garden at lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Planting and Care: Dill does not transplant well so seeds should be planted where the plants will grow. They will eventually be about three feet tall or more so keep that in mind when selecting a place to plant them. Dill prefers to grow in a place with full sun and a well drained ordinary soil.
Text and Photographs Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013

 

RECIPE: Baked Fish with Dill and Onions

2    8 oz each thick deep ocean fish fillets
7 or 8 large freshly cut till plant tops (about 8" long)
1 very large white onion sliced thin
2 to 3 Tablespoons very fresh salted butter
1/2 tsp. freshly ground black pepper or to taste

Heat the oven to 350° F. while you butter the glass casserole, arrange the fish and dill, slice and arrange the onion, grate the pepper over the onions and slice the remaining butter on top. Cover with a glass dish or the shiny side of aluminum foil and bake for just under 1 hour.

 
**Dinner Plate Aralia See The "A" Page ARALIA
 
 

DISEASES AND DEFICIENCIES

These two plant disorders, diseases and deficiencies, seem to me to be the most serious problems in a tropical garden environment and to the novice they are usually difficult to distinguish. If you are in an area close by a governmental or university agriculture department, make use of their expertise. If you encounter a problem in your garden that you do not understand or cannot identify and treat, call them right away for a consultation. We have had extremely good luck here in Montserrat with advice given to us by a Guyanese fellow employed as an agricultural products inspector for the customs department and to advise local farmers.

What follows is information on the plant diseases and deficiencies we have encountered in our gardens and the solutions that seemed to work. It is far from a complete list of the problems you may encounter, but we hope you will find the information useful.

Deficiencies

Chlorosis -- Leaves appear to have splotchy yellowing, that does not follow the leaf veins. This is an indication that the plant is missing one of the minor, but still essential ingredients for its health, probably a mineral. We've had good luck solving this problem by quickly using Miracle Grow in a watered down solution daily for a week or so, but it really is an indication that the soil is inadequate. Using compost and composted manure is a more long term and healthful solution.

Diseases

Damping Off -- Almost all gardeners are familiar with this. You plant your seeds in little pots and not long after the little green shoots appear, they fall over dead. That is a scenario I experienced in New England; here in the Caribbean, our seventy foot long, twelve foot tall hibiscus hedge fell over dead. That puts things quickly in perspective.

Powdery Mildew -- This is what you're seeing when the usually hairy leaves of your plants especially squash & cucumbers take on a talcum powder look while the leaves become very papery before turning yellow and dying. It spreads quickly, but if you catch it quickly you'll do just fine.

Treatment

First remove any infected leaves and place them in a closeable plastic bag for disposal. They may not go into your compost pile. Mix 1 cup of milk with 1 gallon of water and spray each and every leaf and plant that has shown the disease. Keep a close eye on the progress plants make in recovery. If it doesn't look good, pull up and dispose of the entire plant.

We invested in a small garden sprayer that carries about 2 gallons. It isn't too heavy, but it also holds enough of the treatment all at once to make the whole operation pretty efficient.

 
 
Dishcloth Gourd See The "L" Page -- LOOFAH  
Dombea See the "T" Page -- TROPICAL HYDRANGEA
Donkey's Ears See the "K" Page -- KALANCHOE -- Donkey's Ears  
 

Photographed: At the Hotel San Buenaventura on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala in May 2010.

**Donkey's Tail, Burro's Tail Sedum morganianum
This easy to care for plant is almost a "must have" in Mexico and Guatemala. I absolutely love them. This year I got a great surprise, a blossom.
From: Mexico
Planting and Care: They are said to prefer full sun, but I have very often seen them growing beautifully in semi shade. Go light on the water to keep them happy.
Text and Photographs Copyrighted ©KO 2010 & GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2015.

Photographed: At the Hotel San Buenaventura on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala in May 2010.

 

Photographed: In our garden at our home by Lake Atitlan in Guatemala in 2015.

Photographed: In our garden at our home by Lake Atitlan in Guatemala in 2015.

 
 
DRACAENAS
 

Corn plant Dracaena fragrans
From: West Africa
Photographed: At the Hotel San Buenaventura on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala in 2010.
Planting and Care:
The corn plant is tolerant of light level situations, but prefers a semi shady spot with routine rainfall or watering to be at its best.
Text & Photograph Copyrighted ©KO 2010
 

**Dracaena, Dragon Tree (1) Dracaena marginata
A popular house plant in colder climates, ours was thriving in Montserrat in the terrace garden when we left for a holiday. When we got back it had died from the extended drought in Montserrat in the spring and summer of 2007. According to a local friend, "It wasn't a drought; it was a barbecue!" We have a new plant and are hoping for a more hospitable weather pattern this year.
From: Hawaii
Photographed: On the left at a neighbor's home in Woodlands, Montserrat and on the right at the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Planting and Care: Although the plant will grow in the hot sunshine of the Caribbean, I think it prefers a place with a little less sun along with routine rainfall or watering. It will grow quite tall, but its appearance can become spindly so think about pruning it every year or so. Stick the cut stems in a watered garden and you will have new plants to find homes for within a few months.
Text and Photographs Copyrighted ©Krika.com 2008/2010 and GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013
 

Dragon Tree (2), Canary Island Dragon Tree Dracaena draco
Benefits:
From:
Canary Islands and the Cape Verde Islands
Photographed: In the Palermo Botanical Garden in Sicily, Italy.
Planting and Care: I read two very different versions of caring for this tree and I'll give you both, though I think the latter is more likely to give you the tree you'll be looking forward to.
1.
This tree will do fine in a bright semi shady area of the garden. Keep in mind it will eventually be a reasonably short, less than 40 feet tall, and very wide tree so give it some space in anticipation.
2. This tree will thrive in full sun all year round. It prefers a rocky, sandy soil with excellent drainage and little in the way of organic material. Think of a hot dry beach area and that's the ideal.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2012

 

Dwarf Bouquet, Calypso Queen Dracaena deremensis Janet Craig Compacta
Every time I see this plant I immediately think what an incredibly hardy Easter lily. That maybe goes to show how hard it is for me to identify plants, but maybe you'll have the same reaction.
Photographed:
In the Botanical Garden at the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Planting and Care: This is a slow growing member of the family of dracaenas, but like most members it likes bright light and moist soil to grow well.
Text & Photograph Copyrighted ©KO 2010
Striped Dracaena Dracaena Deremensis 'Gold Star'
Photographed:
In the Botanical Garden at the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Planting and Care: Bright light and a damp, not wet, soil will keep this dracaena growing happily.
Text & Photographs Copyrighted ©KO 2010

 

**Lucky Bamboo, Lucky Lily Dracaena sanderiana
This is the poor plant that had the terrible karma to be introduced to the commercial market as a "lucky bamboo" as part of the feng shui craze. It finds itself growing in a twisted glass bottle and I can't imagine how that would feel. Can you?
From: Western Africa and now widely grown in gardens throughout the Caribbean
Photographed: In our shady terrace garden at our former home in Montserrat.
Planting and Care: This is an easy to care for plant which probably was what sealed its fate with the twisted glass tubes. From having one for a few years I think a bright semi shady spot in a garden that receives routine rainfall or watering would suit it perfectly.

Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©Krika.com 2008
 

Song of India, Pleomele, Reflexed Dracaena Dracaena reflexa
Benefits:
From:
Madagascar
Photographed: In the Palermo Botanical Garden in Sicily, Italy.
Planting and Care:

 
 
 
 

**Dragon Tree -- See Dracaena above

**Drunken Sailor See The "R" Page -- RANGOON CREEPER

 

**Dusty Miller, Silver Ragwort Senecio cineraria, Cineraria maritima
I regret to admit that I deemed this plant unattractive from my very early years as an adult with a beautiful already established garden to manage. Along with all of the exuberantly beautiful plants and shrubs, I had dusty miller to look at and tend. In my opinion, if you are already depressed and looking for plant company, you've found a friend in dusty miller.
From: Central America
Photographed: In the Botanical Garden at the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Planting and Care: Dusty Miller likes full sun and is not at all fussy about its soil base. Water it regularly until it is settled in and then pretty much let it be. It is very hardy.
Text & Photograph Copyrighted ©KO 2010
 

Dutchman's Pipe, Giant Pelican Flower Aristolochia brazillensis, Aristolochia grandiflora and Aristolochia gigantea
This very strange plant has a seemingly very normal and almost delicate vine which produces the almost creepy, papery, foot long "flowers" shown below on the right. This is the variety that produces the largest flowers and shown on the left and right is a variety with smaller though no less strange flowers.
From: The southeastern US
Photographed:
In the Botanical Garden at the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala and in the Winter Garden in Auckland, New Zealand.
Planting and Care: This is an easy plant to get off the ground and it is a perennial so it is worth paying a little attention in the beginning. In warm climates it prefers a semi shady location, but any decent soil will do as long as it gets some routine rainfall or watering. What it does need is support so plan to give it a trellis or something similar to grow on.
Text & Photograph Copyrighted ©KO 2010 and GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013
 

 
**Dwarf Cone Ginger See the "G" Page GINGER -- Red Button Ginger
 
Dwarf Mallow, Sleepy Hibiscus, Turk's Cap, Firecracker Hibiscus Malvaviscus arboreus or Hibiscus drummondii or Pavonia drummondii
This is a striking plant because of how its bright red flowers set off the green of its lush foliage. The flowers aren't extraordinary, but the overall effect of the plant certainly is. It makes a nice size shrub growing to be as much as 10 feet tall.
Benefits: This plant will attract both butterflies and hummingbirds.
From: South America, Peru and/or Central America
Planting and Care: Dwarf mallows like to be in either full sun or bright semi shade. They don't like heavy winds and so are ideal plantings against a wall or building.

Text Copyrighted ©KO 2011
 

**Dwarf Poinciana See The "P" Page -- PRIDE OF BARBADOS

Dwarf Tibouchina See the "T" Page -- TRAILING TIBOUCHINA

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