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Agave falcata (no common name yet)
Benefits:
From:

Photographed:   In the Royal Botanical Gardens in Sydney, Australia, 2013.
Planting and Care:
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013
 
Agave Spot, Manfreda, Manfreda virginica
This is not one of the huge tortured leaves agaves, but one with leaves extending only about 15". Nevertheless, it is very appealing and in northern climates will make an attractive greenhouse specimen.
Benefits:
From:

Photographed: In the Blithewold Garden in Bristol, Rhode Island 2013.
Planting and Care: The agave spot or Manfreda prefers full sun in cooler climates and a bit of shade during the hot mid day in warm climates. It likes well drained soil and light watering. Its advantage as an agave is that it is more cold tolerant than other members of its family.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013
 

**Variegated Century Plant Agave angustifolia variegata or maybe Agave Caribaea
This is a yellow and green variety of plant in the large yucca family, a great old standby in gardens from New England, where we had one in the garden when I was growing up, to Mexico and now to the Caribbean. As it was in the States and Mexico, here in Montserrat this plant has so far proved immune to disease, fungus, and insects as well as being highly resistant to volcanic ash. As an added plus, it regularly sends out runners from which you can make new plants. Its downside is the extremely sharp points at the ends of its leaves, but that seems a small price to pay for such an attractive and worry free plant.

Photographed: In our front border garden at our former home in Montserrat.
Planting and Care: Once planted in a sunny spot in the garden with room to grow the agaves seem grateful for almost any kindness, a little dirt, a little water, lots of sun and they don't complain. If you enhance any of those things, except the water, your plant will thrive.

Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©KO 2008

 

 

Blue Agave Agave tequilana
If you have ever tasted mescal or tequila, this is the plant that has given you the blessing. Although there are parts of Mexico historically known for the huge fields of these plants, with the advent of tequila's popularity these agaves can be found all over the country where ever the climate approximates its needs.
From: Mexico as you might have already guessed.
Photographed: At the Botanical Garden in Naples, Italy, in 2012
Text & Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring 2012

 
**Century Plant (1) Agave americanum or Agave palmeri
We had these icy green leaved variety of agaves growing in our Montserrat garden, understandable since the plant is native to tropical America. These plants were very different from the ones we had in Mexico; the surface of its leaves is papery and rough while the Mexican variety is hard and very smooth.
Benefits: It is said that juice squeezed from the leaves of an agave will treat dandruff.
Photographed: In our garden at our former home in Montserrat.
Planting and Care: Once planted in a sunny spot in the garden with room to grow agaves seem grateful for almost any kindness, a little dirt, a little water, lots of sun and they don't complain. If you enhance any of those things, except the water, your plant will thrive. Sadly a neighboring house was being renovated by local architect, Alford Dyett, and at one of his drunken parties on the property one of his guests drove a pick up truck over this beautiful plant. Alford was very offended that we even mentioned it to him. He is very Montserratian.
Text & Photographs Copyrighted ©KO 2008
 

Century Plant (2), Maguey, American Aloe (no relative of aloes) Agave americana 'Marginata'
I love these plants for their artistic and architectural qualities. They never seem constrained with the idea that a plant is supposed to grow a certain way. Each one of these beauties finds its own way and asks for very little in the process. Under good conditions they can reach a spread of twelve feet or so. When they reach the age of thirty years or so, they will bloom and die, leaving behind small plants to replace itself.
Benefits: According to Wikipedia.com, "If the flower stem is cut without flowering, a sweet liquid called aguamiel ("honey water") gathers in the heart of the plant. This may be fermented to produce the drink called pulque." Pulque was produced and enjoyed by certain classes within Aztec society and it is still produced and sold in the market in Taxco where we lived for many years. Maguey is also a source plant for mezcal and tequila.
From:
Mexico
Planting and Care: These are desert plants which will appreciate being in full sun. They are ideal for xeriscape gardens in relatively warm climates.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013

Photographed: In the Blithewold Garden in Bristol, Rhode Island 2013.

Photographed: At the Lu Baruni campsite in Scopello, Sicily, Italy in 2012.

 
Dwarf Century Plant Agave desmettiana
  Benefits:
From:
Mexico
Photographed: At the Roger Williams Park Botanical Center in Rhode Island in 2013.
Planting and Care:
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013
 
Flexible Spined Hardy Century Plant Agave flexispina
This is another very appealing agave growing low and wide becoming about a foot and a half tall and twice as wide.
Benefits:
From:
High altitude Mexico
Photographed:   In the Royal Botanical Gardens in Sydney, Australia, 2013.
Planting and Care: This is one of those wondrous plants being both drought tolerant and frost hardy. Plant it in full sun and enjoy. Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013
 

**Foxtail Agave Agave attenuata
This is a beautiful agave and should find its way into every warm climate garden. I now have one of my own and it never ceases to draw my eyes.
From:
Mexico
Photographed: Below in the Botanical Garden at the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala and on the right in my own garden at Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Planting and care: This agave is especially desirable if you have children in the garden area as it has no sharp points or edges. It's color is lovely as well. Give it full sun, a moderate amount of water and it will thrive. It is not cold hardy.
Text & Photographs Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013

No longer one of my mystery plants thanks to Peter at http:www/cactusjungle.com

 
 
Gypsum Century Plant Agave gypsophila
This is a very appealing agave for its unique appearance in family of rather spiky relatives. It will grow to be only two to three feet tall so it is a manageable plant for most warm climate gardens.
Benefits:
From:
Mexico
Photographed:   In the Royal Botanical Gardens in Sydney, Australia, 2013.
Planting and Care: This plant will grow well in full, but it is amenable to a bit of shade. Plant it in well drained soil where it will be very tolerant of drought. It is not frost hardy.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013
 
Maguey, Century Plant (3) Agave atrovirens
As you can see on the left, the flower stalk looks pretty much identical to an asparagus stem, one of our favorite foods. When we were exploring by car in Sicily in late spring, we delighted in pointing out these "asparagus." Benefits: Well, in truth, what could be a better gift than mescal?
From:
Mexico
Planting and Care: This six foot wide and twelve foot tall plant likes to live in full sun in a dry climate. It has very sharp spines and its sap may well give you a severe, very nasty rash. If you have ever had poison ivy, this will seem like that was a walk in the park.
Text and Photographs Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013

Photographed: By the side of the road in Sicily, Italy, in 2012.

Photographed: In the Palermo Botanical Garden in Sicily, Italy.

 

Photographed: By the side of the road in Sicily, Italy, in 2012.

 

Queen Victoria Agave Agave victoriae-reginae 'Compacta'
I was surprised to find this tiny member of what I think of as a family of relatively large plants.
Benefits:
From:
Mexico
Planting and Care: From Mexico as are many of the members of the agave family, this plant is unusual for its small size, less than one foot in height. It will grow in either sun or shade and it is tolerant of cold up to 15° F. and to drought conditions making it perfect for small xeriscape gardens.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013

Photographed: In the Royal Botanical Garden in Sydney, Australia, in 2013.

 

Photographed: In the Royal Botanical Garden in Sydney, Australia, in 2013.

Photographed: In the Carlos Thays Botanical Garden in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

 

Sisal, Sisal Hemp Agave Sisalana
This is the infamous plant grown in the Yucatan, the very hot and dry northeastern part of Mexico. Under turn of the century Mexican dictator, Diaz, thousands of Sonoran desert Indians were rounded up and transported by train across Mexico to work on sisal plantations which produced a very desirable and profitable rope. Life expectancy for the Sonorans on these plantations was fairly short, maybe a year or two. But Diaz had an endless supply of people to remove from their lands as he had many American friends like the Rockefellers who were given huge estates which had to be emptied of native peoples. To me, sisal is almost indistinguishable from the Blue Agave pictured above.
Planting and care:
From:

Photographed: At the Botanical Garden in Naples, Italy, in 2012
Text & Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2012
 

**Agave Mystery #1
This little beauty -- eventually to be huge -- had a special place in our upper garden at our former home in Montserrat. I just loved it!
Photographed: In our upper garden at our former home in Montserrat in the West Indies.
Planting and Care: Once planted in a sunny spot in the garden with room to grow, the agaves seem grateful for almost any kindness, a little dirt, a little water, lots of sun and they don't complain. If you enhance any of those things, except the water, your plant will thrive.

Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©Krika.com 2008/2010
 
 
 

Agave Mystery #2
This is a stunning plant. We brought seeds from a friend's farm in the central highlands of Mexico to our former home in Montserrat. We planted them, but nothing ever appeared. Maybe the seeds weren't dry enough when I secreted them for the trip from Mexico through Miami, Puerto Rico, Antigua and finally Montserrat.
Planting and Care: As with most agaves, this one prefers a gritty well drained soil and all the sun you can provide.
Text Copyrighted ©KO 2008 and GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013

Agave Mystery #3
Photographed: Beside the road in Sicily, Italy, in 2012.
Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2012  

Could this be an Agave Dragon Toes?

Agave Mystery #5
Photographed: In the Winter Garden in Auckland, New Zealand, in 2013.
Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013 

Agave Mystery #6
Photographed: In the Winter Garden in Auckland, New Zealand, in 2013.
Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013 

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