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Jacaranda Tree Jacaranda mimosafolia D. Don or Jacaranda acutifolia HUMB. and BONPL. or Jacaranda cuspidifolia
Just after dropping its feathery leaves, the jacaranda bursts into purple blooms. It is maybe best identified by the seed pods which are almost always hanging from the tree, but don't mistake it for a flamboyant which has similar seed pods. It reaches its full height of forty to sixty feet when mature when it will also have a fifty foot spread. It is a common tree in Taxco and in almost all parts of Mexico.
Benefits: In Panama the bark is used in treating skin diseases.
From:
The jacaranda originated in Brazil according to one botanist or in northwestern Argentina according to another.
Still others believe its origin to have been in Central and South America and the Caribbean. The Jacaranda is also very common in South Africa, so who knows?
Photograph:
These photographs were taken in Colonia Reforma, a suburb of Oaxaca, Mexico.
Planting and Care:
It does best in full sun and it will tolerate a long dry season, eight months in most of Mexico. Jacarandas do not do particularly well in very windy locations.
Text and Photographs Copyrighted ©KO 2008/2010 and ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2012
 
**Jade Plant, Jade Tree, Gollum Jade, Succulent Spoon Jade Shrek Plant, Trumpet Jade, Money Plant Crassula ovata, Crassula ovata, Crassula argentea
This is a very appealing plant with thick deep green fleshy leaves on stems that make the overall plant look like a tiny ancient tree. They are very easy to grow either as house plants or outside where there is no frost. They will get quite large when they are happy.
From: South Africa
Planting and Growth: Jade plants like good light and can handle the Caribbean sun, but preferably only in the early morning. If you plant them in your garden, do so in an area that receives some sun and regular rainfall or you'll have to do light watering.
Text and Photographs Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014

Photograph: In a garden in Colonia Reforma, a suburb of Oaxaca, Mexico.

Photographed: In Parque de la Leyendas, Lima, Peru, in 2013.

 

 

Jamaican Forget-Me-Not, Bushviolet, Amethyst Flower Browallia americana
This is a warm climate perennial that comes with white, blue or purple blossoms.
Benefits:
From:
Tropical Americas
Photographed: In the Botanical Garden at the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Planting and Care: This plant does best in semi shade planted in a rich soil and given plenty of rainfall or watering. Don't hesitate to pinch it back to maintain and attractive shape.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013

#27 Flower Mystery solved
by Ursula G. living in Southern Germany

 
**Jamaica Sago See The "P" Page PALMS AND SAGOS -- Jamaica Sago
 
 

Japanese Anemone, Chinese Anemone, Thimbleweed, Windflower Anemone hupehensis or Anemone x hybrida
As you can see from the many places I've photographed this lovely perennial, it's very popular and also one of my personal favorites. It will grow to be about three or four feet tall and will normally flower from mid summer into the fall.
Benefits:
From:
China
Planting and Care: The Japanese anemone can be a little difficult to get started, but once it settles in it can become a little too confident, encroaching on less vigorous nearby plants. It likes to grow in semi shady conditions which makes it a great addition to any garden where full sun is in short supply. Water them carefully never giving them too much or too little and they'll do just fine. As you can see from the photograph locations below, it seems this plant may prefer cool climates.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014

Flower Mysteries 2, 38. 48 and 57 were solved by my friend Ursula G. living in Southern Germany

Photographed: In a private garden in Calafate, Patagonia, Argentina, 2011.

Photographed: In the Blithewold Garden in Bristol, Rhode Island, 2013.

Photographed: In the Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens, Boothbay Maine, 2013.

Photographed: Photographed: In the Blithewold Garden in Bristol, Rhode Island 2013.

Photographed: In the Wellington Botanic Garden in Wellington, New Zealand, in 2013.

Photographed: At the Roger Williams Park Botanical Center, Providence, RI, in 2013.
Flower Mysteries 4 and 4a were identified by Susan I. a Twitter friend from Sydney, Australia.

Photographed: At the Roger Williams Park Botanical Center, Providence, RI, in 2013.
Flower Mysteries 4 and 4a were identified by Susan I. a Twitter friend from Sydney, Australia.

 
 
Japanese Bugbane Actaea japonica
  Benefits:
From:

Photographed: In the Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens, Boothbay Maine, 2013.
Planting and Care:
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013
 
 
Japanese Umbrella Pine Sciadopitys verticillata
This is a slow growing delightful evergreen that would make a beautiful garden centerpiece. In many years it will reach a height of more than 80 feet.
Benefits:
From:
Japan
Photographed: At the Roger Williams Park Botanical Center in Rhode Island in 2013.
Planting and Care:
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014
 
 
JASMINE

Angel Wing Jasmine Jasminum nitidum
Photographed: In the Botanical Garden at the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Text & Photograph Copyrighted ©KO 2010

 

Azores Jasmin Jasminum azoricum
Like many jasmin plants this climbing one is less appealing for its flowers and foliage than for its heavenly scent.
From:
The Azores as the name suggests.
Photographed:
In the Botanical Garden at the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Planting and Care: Like most jasmins, this one is sensitive to cool or cold weather. It prefers to be planted in an always warm semi shady area of the garden where it will receive regular watering or rainfall.

Text & Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013

 

Photographed: At a friend's home in Olveston, Montserrat.

Night Blooming Jasmine Cestrum nocturnam
      Never having had one of these trees and never having smelled the flowers at night, this is what I wrote about this tree some years ago. "This type of jasmine may not be glorious during the day as the flowers look a little bedraggled, but at night it is luxurious, maybe one of the best smelling plants in the world and this is when the flowers open and are at their best."
     Things changed and I ended up having one in my new garden where my glowing opinion of this tree quickly changed. Its major attraction, the nighttime scent, turned out to smell like something from a can sold to "freshen" bathrooms. Not very appealing. Make sure before you go to the trouble of planting one that you really do enjoy the flowers at night.
From: Tropical America
Planting and Care: These small trees rely on full sun, lots of water and warm temperatures to be at their best. Once established they can handle a bit of cool weather, but this really is a tropical plant at heart.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©KO 2010 and ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring 2013

Photographed: In our garden at Lake Atitlan in Guatemala, 2012.

 

Orange Jasmine, Orange Jessamine, Mock Orange, Chinese Box Murraya exotica
  Benefits:
From:
Tropical Asia
Photographed: Below our mahogany garden at our former home in Montserrat in 2008.
Planting and Care: This shrub came with our former home in Montserrat. It was planted in full sun and always did well with the rainfall that fell, enduring very hot and dry periods with no water when we were away. It became ill at one point, so I simply cut it back almost to the ground and it rebounded within a short few months.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014

My #14 Shrub Mystery was solved by two visitors to my website, Glenn who lives in Brisbane, Australia and Kim H. Many thanks for your help.

 

**Pinwheel Jasmine Flowering Bush Tabernacle montana
This is a delightful delicately flowering bush that pruned carefully has an airy lightness about it that is not characteristic of most tropical foliage. Its 3/4 inch flowers might be overlooked without their special scent and wonderful abundance. Our plants have been blooming continuously for months. Pinwheel Jasmine can and often is used as a trimmed hedge which seems to rob it of all of its best qualities.
Photographed: As a center piece in our herb garden at our former home in Montserrat.
Text & Photographs Copyrighted ©KO 2008/2010

 
 
JATROPHA

**Spicy Jatropha, Coral Bush, Pergrina Jatropha pandurata
This member of the jatropha family is tougher looking than the more feathery leaved one pictured below, but each of these family members has a distinct appeal. It is said to have a sap that can be irritating to the skin, but I did not find it to be so.
Benefits:
From:

Planting and Care: Give it full sun or sun with some shade and it will do just fine, but do keep it on the dry side. It is not at all cold tolerant, though once established it will do fine in drought conditions. It may grow up to 15 feet tall and almost as wide, but with pruning it will be a more manageable size.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2015

Photographed: In the (Ortobotanico) Botanical Garden in Naples, Italy, in 2014.

Photographed:   At the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.

 

**Jatropha, Coral Plant, Physic Nut, Guatemala Rhubarb Jatropha multifida
This is a very tough flowering shrub/tree that grows to a height somewhere between eight and fifteen feet. The tallest one I saw in Montserrat was about ten feet high. Ours suffered from a history of brutal gardeners and falling volcanic ash before we bought the property. Despite all that, it continued to bloom, proving its reputation as a plant that will withstand almost anything and still give you flowers most of the year. Wouldn't it be nice if we were all this tough? This plant looks very much like a variety of frangipani, though its leaves are more decorative and it blooms almost continuously with red flowers as you can see in the photographs. One important thing to remember is that for all its appeal, it is still a highly poisonous plant.
From: Cuba and/or Central America
Photographed: Just beside our banana garden at our former home in Montserrat.
Planting and Growth: The jatropha likes it sunny and hot and is very tolerant of drought. With just a bit more care and even a semi shady location, the jatropha will do just fine. Our plants almost always produced seeds which quickly germinated so we always had an abundant supply of small plants to give away to friends and neighbors.
Text and Photos Copyrighted ©KO 2008/2010 and GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013

 
 

**Jelly Bean Cactus Sedum rubrotinetum
This is a wonderful plant that I never tiring of admiring. I have it growing wonderfully in a pot, but very slowly in the cactus garden. It is a delightful, very easy to care for plant and its cheerful name gives you a little hint at how appealing it is.
Benefits:
From:
Mexico
Planting and Care: I read that the jelly bean likes full sun and that may be so in cool climate summers. Here in Latin America, the sun is very strong and the plant quickly looks like I do when out in the sun too long. I have it receiving morning sun only now and it is beautiful. Water it thoroughly when the soil becomes dry and it will do very well.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013

Photographed: In the Blithewold Garden in Bristol, Rhode Island, 2013.

Photographed: In our garden at Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.

 

Jerusalem Sage Lamiaceae phlomis tuberosa
This is a perennial plant that will grow a few feet in height. Not normally prized as a garden flower, it is often found growing wild on roadsides and in unused fields. It will flower most of the summer in New England and I found it very appealing.
Benefits: Some parts of the plant are considered edible.
From:
The cold central parts of Europe eastward through to Siberia.
Photographed: In the Botanical Garden in Palermo, Sicily, Italy, 2012.
Planting and Care: Plant seeds in the place where you would like to see this grow. Full sun and routine watering or rainfall will keep the plants happy.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013

My #8 Flower Mystery was solved by my friend Ursula G. living in Southern Germany

 

Jewels of Opar, Fame Flower, Flame Flower Talinum paniculatum
This is an annual and it is not happy about being too cold. At its best, it will grow to be about two feet tall and plants should be spaced about 1 to 1 and 1/2 feet apart.
Benefits:
From:

Photographed: In the Blithewold Garden in Bristol, Rhode Island 2013.
Planting and Care: Plant these little beauties in full sun and expect to enjoy blooms for most of the summer. It is drought tolerant once settled in and could be considered for a xeriscape garden.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013

My #50 Flower Mystery was solved by my friend Ursula G. living in Southern Germany

 
**Jimson Weed See The "D" Page DEVIL'S TRUMPET
 
Jitsuko's Star Leopard Plant Farfugium japonicum 'Jitsuko's Star', F. tussilagineum, Ligularia tussilaginea
This is a peculiarly appealing perennial plant with both very attractive foliage and pretty flowers.
From: Japan
Planting and Care: This is one of those plants that prefers early morning or late afternoon sun.

Text & Photograph Copyrighted ©KO 2010

Photographed: At the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala in 2010.

Photographed: At the Blithewold Mansion, Gardens and Arboretum in Bristol, Rhode Island, in 2014.

 
 
JOSEPH'S COAT

**Joseph's Coat (1), Match-Me-If-You-Can Acalypha wilkesiana
This is a wonderful bit of greenery with each leaf seemingly a work of art combining greens and whites and never quite the same, hence its second common name.
From: This plant hales from the humid and warm parts of the South Pacific.
Photographed: In our deck garden at our former home in Montserrat.
Planting and Care:
Joseph's coat loves heat, moisture and sun and will delight you when it receives them. When it gets dry it looks very sad indeed. It is easy to grow from a cutting; put several in a sandy soil mix kept moist and in bright light and soon you'll have healthy new plants. Once in the garden, keep the dead flowers picked off and stem ends routinely pinched to have it at its best.
Note: Joseph's coat is related to a large pretty well known family including the Copper Leaf and Chenille Plants.
 

Joseph's Coat (2), Calico Plant, Joyweed Alternanthera ficoidea
Photographed: At the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Text and Photographs Copyrighted ©KO 2010

 

Joseph's Coat (3), Match-Me-If-You-Can, Copper Leaf, Beefsteak Plant, Fire Dragon Acalypha godseffiana
This bush provides a striking bit of colorful and oddly shaped foliage in a tropical garden.
From: This plant hales from the humid and warm parts of the South Pacific.
Photographed: At the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Planting and Care: This is an easy one as it grows in full sun with little water. It is easily propagated by cuttings and will grow to be as tall as ten feet if happy. Keeping it well pruned will prevent it from becoming leggy.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©KO 2010
 

Joseph's Coat (4) Acalypha wilkesiana Hoffmanna
This is a leafy tall growing slender bush. It does not appear to flower, but does serve as a decorative green and white background or filler plant
.
Photographed: At a neighbor's home in Montserrat.
Text & Photograph Copyrighted ©Krika.com 2008/2010
 

Joseph's Coat (5) Alternanthera ficoidea
This low growing plant is useful as a fill in as it brings a stable bit of color to a garden that may sometimes be lacking in blooms.
Benefits:
From:
Mexico and South America
Photographed: At the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala in 2010.
Planting and Care: This Joseph's Coat is a warm climate perennial that will grow well in full sun or partial shade. It is easy to grow and likes routine watering or rainfall.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014

My #7 Plant Mystery was solved by Glenn a visitor to my website who lives in Brisbane, Australia. Many Thanks.

 
 
 
Joyweed See Above JOSEPH'S COAT (2)
 
**Jumbie Beads Abrus precatorius L.
This is a tenacious twining vine that produces bright orange/red seeds used in jewelry and other crafts in the Caribbean.
Benefits: Its seeds are poisonous, though other parts of the plant are used locally here in Montserrat for their healing qualities.
Planting and Care: Unless you plant to use the seeds, I would not recommend letting this plant grow in your garden. It is hard to eradicate and it is prolific.
Text Copyrighted ©KO 2008
 
**Jumbie Crab See The "W" Page -- WILDLIFE -- Black Crab

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