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Ice Plant, Highway Ice Plant, Hottentot Fig Dorotheanthus or Lampranthus or Carpobrotus edulis
This is a succulent annual or perennial from S. Africa which we saw growing in pure sand by many of the beaches we visited on the Greek islands of Corfu, Naxos, Paros and Antiparos late in the spring of 2007. The flowers come in brilliant colors and this is one tough plant to grow so happily on almost nothing in a climate where high temperatures can be well over 100° F., where rainfall is not so common and where winter brings freezing temperatures. I liked it so much I saved some seeds from the ice plants and some from other wild flowers in Greece and was hoping to have a "Greek Garden" at our former home in Montserrat. Now I'll have one in our new garden in Guatemala.
From: South Africa
Planting and Growth: This is a peculiar plant liking full sun, any type of soil and almost no water.
Text Copyrighted ©KO 2007/2008 and GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014

Photographed: On the roadside in Sicily, Italy, in 2012.

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

Photographed: On the roadside in Sicily, Italy, in 2012.

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

Photographed: On the roadside in Sicily, Italy, in 2012.

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

 

Photographed: In the Jardim de Olhao in Agadiz, Morocco, in 2014.

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

Photographed: In our garden at Lake Atitlan in Guatemala in 2015.

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

 

Photographed: At the Hacienda San Buenaventura on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

**Impatiens Impatiens sp.
This is perhaps the best known and most commercial of shade garden flowering plants. In tropical climates they are perennials, but not in places where winters bring freezing weather.
From: Asian and African tropics
Planting and Care: This is the proverbial shade garden blooming plant and it is as easy to care for as it is unremarkable. Plant it in good soil in the shade and give it routine watering and you will have a bit of color where there was only green before.
Text and Photographs Copyrighted ©KO 2010 and GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013

Photographed: At the Hacienda San Buenaventura on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

A lot of work is being done to dress up the common look of this shade garden standby as you can see in the photographs below. Lovely changes, no?

Photographed: At the Hacienda San Buenaventura on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.

 To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

Photographed: At the Winter Garden in Auckland, New Zealand, in 2013.
To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!
 
**Iguana See The "W" Page -- WILDLIFE - Iguanas

 

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

**Inch Plant, Wandering Jew Tradescantia albiflora, Tradescantia fluminensis, Zebrina pendula or Tradescantia zebrina
With its tiny leaves and spreading nature, the inch plant might be a good option for a ground cover. Once you plant it though, plan to live with it forever. It is very difficult to get rid of.
From: Tropical Americas
Photographed: At the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Planting and Care: This plant is a true survivor. It will grow in full sun or full shade and will tolerate a wide range of moisture levels.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©KO 2008/2010
 
**India Carnation, Crape Jasmine Gardenia jasminoides or Tabernaemontana coronaria or Tabernaemontana divaricuta
In Montserrat we had one of these bushes locally called a gardenia, but it had no scent and so can't possibly be even in the gardenia family. It has shiny deep green leaves and abundant creamy white flowers.
Photographed: In our terrace garden at our former home in Montserrat.
Planting and Care: The crape jasmine is a hardy bush that grows at an alarming rate and all the while provides lovely white blossoms. Sadly, they don't have much of a scent. Ours survived in a semi shady area with little care; we have seen them also growing as well with no care so these are wonderful plants to consider for a tropical garden, but the flowers lack the size and scent that truly defines the gardenia of my dreams. This variety prefers bright light shade, moist soil and a lot of fertilizer and will produce a prolific number of blossoms.
Text and Photographs Copyrighted ©Krika.com 2008/2010 and GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013

 
**Indian Borage See The "T" Page -- THYME -- Spanish Thyme
 

Photographed: In our border gardens at our former home in Montserrat.

**Indian Fig Opuntia, Barbury Fig, Cactus Pear, Nopal Cactus, Prickly Pear Cactus, Edible Tree Cactus, Mission Cactus Opuntia ficus-indica
       On the top left is the oval shaped spiny thin leaved branching cactus found in Montserrat, but also so common in Mexico. The leaves are scraped clean of their spines, cooked and eaten most deliciously in omelets.
      
The prickly pear cactus in the photo on the bottom left very closely resembles the one above, but its paddles are fat and more icy green in color. In Montserrat they are very subject to a wasting disease that didn't seem to affect our other cactus plants. The ice green prickly pear has chubby oval pads with lots of long sharp spines and will grow to between ten and fifteen feet tall.
Benefits:
In all of the small outlying villages we have visited in Mexico, the paddle shaped leaves of the nopal are believed to have a beneficial effect in controlling diabetes. They may also have a very important effect on cholesterol -- lowering the bad while leaving the good alone!

The fruit is said to be helpful in treating coughs. Carefully peel and wash the pears. Crush the fruit and mix it with honey and lemon or lime juice. Strain the mixture and take it in tablespoons as needed.
From: Probably Mexico
Fruits: Its fruits growing from red and yellow flowers are called tunas in Mexico; I think the English version is prickly pear. Handle these fruits carefully as they do have nasty very tiny spines.
  Text and Photographs Copyrighted ©KO 2008 ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014

Note: The "opuntia" seems to be a huge class of paddle shaped cactus plants. They are quite beautiful and very different from one another in growth, susceptibility to disease, hardiness and more. Still, I haven't been able to find good information on specific plants. They always seem lumped together as opuntia. If you have more information, please get in touch.

 

Photographed: In our border gardens at our former home in Montserrat.

 

Photographed: In the Botanical Garden in Palermo, Sicily, Italy, 2012.

Photographed: In the Botanical Garden in Palermo, Sicily, Italy, 2012.

 

Photographed: On the roadside in Sicily, Italy, 2012.

Photographed: On the roadside in Sicily, Italy, 2012.

 

Photographed: On the roadside in Sicily, Italy, 2012.

Photographed: On the roadside in Sicily, Italy, 2012.

Recipe: Tuna Margarita

Crush prickly pear fruits and push them through a sieve to remove the seeds. Add a squeeze of key lime, a few ice cubes and blend with tequila for a very Mexican margarita. We had this drink for the first time in Oaxaca, Mexico, at a tequila festival. We liked it then and we still do!

 

Indian Hawthorn, India Hawthorn Rhaphiolepsis indica (probably 'Springtime')
This is a warm weather plant that grows well as a border for the house foundation, as a hedge and even as a small tree.
Benefits: The flowers of these lovely plants produce edible berries which are often used to make jam.
From: South Asia and Japan
Photographed: In a private garden in Sicily, Italy, in 2012.
Planting and Care: Grow in full sun in relatively moist soil to have a fall and winter blooming joy in what can be a pretty dull garden in those times of the year.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2014

My #28 Shrub Mystery was solved by Glenn a visitor to my website who lives in Brisbane, Australia. Many thanks for your help.

 
Indian Mulberry See The "N" Page -- NONI
 
**Indian Tree Spurge See the "P" Page -- PENCIL TREE CACTUS
 
**Indian Tulip Tree See The "P" Page -- PORTIA TREE
 
Indigo Iochroma See the "P" Page -- PURPLE BELLS
 
Indigo Spires Sage See the "S" Page -- SALVIAS -- Indigo Spires Sage
 

Infusion
An infusion is made when you pour boiling water over plant parts and drink it as a tea. When it is suggested that you make an infusion, do just that. Do not boil the plant materials as they may prove more damaging than helpful. A continuing struggle between me and my husband over "cures" might be summed up well for everyone, "Some is good, more is not better."
Text Copyrighted ©KO 2008/2010

 

Insects in our tropical garden See The "W" Page -- WILDLIFE

Please also See the "P" Page PESTICIDES
Those listed are the only ones we use and all are natural products.

 
 
IRISES
 
 **Bearded Iris
This is a flowering plant I have loved almost since before I have a memory. We had a row of them facing the right side of our little house as I was growing up. I loved them then and I still do.
Benefits:
From:
Planting and Care:
For all of its elegant beauty, the bearded iris is hardy. They even grow and flower beside multi-lane highways in Mexico City. Give them full sun in more northerly places and some afternoon shade in hotter climates and they'll be just fine. Water when dry and always plant them in places where there is good drainage. They do prefer a slightly acidic soil which should be easy to provide. With some of these beauties in your garden, you will never be disappointed especially with the lovely delicate scent of their lush flowers.
Text and Photographs Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring 2014

Photographed: We found this one growing in the Palermo, Sicily, Italy, Botanical Garden.

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

 

Photographed: This appeared to be something of an after thought in the Naples, Italy, Botanical Garden.

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

Photographed: We found this one growing in the city street gardens in Malaga, Spain.

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

Photographed: The one was in similar circumstances as the one in Naples, but was growing in the Buenos Aires, Argentina, Botanical Garden.

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

 

Photographed: This appeared to be something of an after thought in the Naples, Italy, Botanical Garden.

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

Photographed: This appeared to be something of an after thought in the Naples, Italy, Botanical Garden.

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

Photographed: In the Naples, Italy, Botanical Garden in 2014.

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

 

Photographed: In the Naples, Italy, Botanical Garden in 2014.

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

 

Stinking Iris Flower, Gladdon, Gladwin Iris, Roast-beef Plant, Stinking Gladwin Iris foetidissima
I don't think this is a real knock out iris, but it probably would be a good choice for an iris collector. Its unappealing name comes from the fact that its leaves have a meaty smell when brushed. Left alone it isn't an issue.
  Benefits:
From:
Britain
Photographed: In the Botanical Garden in Naples, Italy, in 2014.
Planting and Care: As you can imagine from its native country of Britain, this is a temperate climate iris which will do just fine through those terrible winters.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2015

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

 

**Twelve Apostles, Walking Iris Neomarica gracilis
These are not large iris flowers, but they do stand out for their combination of colors and patterns. The foliage of these plants is no larger than about 2 feet tall.

I now have these lovelies growing the the entrance walkway to our home in Guatemala and have learned a little more about them. First, they are much like walking iris. They bloom for a day at which point the stem leans over and attempts to plant itself. So far, they appear to bloom twice a year, heavily in the cool dry winter months and lightly in the mid summer rainy season.
From: Central and South America
Planting and Care: Plant in full sun as I have seen them growing or in bright light and they'll do just fine with routine rainfall or regular watering.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2015

Photographed: At the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala in 2010.

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

Photographed: In our garden at Lake Atitlan in Guatemala in 2015.

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

 
Yellow Iris, Yellow Flag, Water Flag Iris pseudacorus
While I love almost every iris I've met, this one is especially appealing. It is tall, 3 feet or more, and its bountiful yellow flowers are delightful.  Benefits: This is an especially valuable plant in that it has the capacity to take in heavy metals through its roots.
From:
Britain
Photographed: In the Botanical Garden in Naples, Italy, in 2014.
Planting and Care: This is one of those many irises that prefer an aquatic environment.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2015
To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!
 

Yellow Iris and Papyrus
Photographed: In the Orto Botanico in Naples, Italy, in 2013.

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!


Photographed:
In the Orto Botanico in Naples, Italy, in 2014.

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

 

Photographed: In the Orto Botanico in Naples, Italy, in 2013.

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

Photographed: In the Orto Botanico in Naples, Italy, in 2013.

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

 

**Walking Iris, Yellow Walking Iris Iris Neomarica Longifolia or Trimezia martinicensis
This is a delightful variety of iris that starts off flowering in a very minimal way and then works itself up into producing a lovely show. It proved to be very hardy, handling droughts and acid rains along with falling ash from the Soufriere volcano in Montserrat.
From: Central and South America
Photographed: This photograph was taken in the garden by our driveway at our former home in Montserrat.
Planting and Care: The walking iris is able to grow well in full sun or shade and pretty much with or without water. It produces flowers on an ever extending branch that eventually falls over and takes root; hence the name walking iris.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©Krika.com 2008

 

Iris Mystery #1 and #1a
Photographed: At the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©KO 2010

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

 

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

 

Iris Mystery #2
Photographed: At the Hotel Atitlan on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©KO 2010

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

 
 
**Ironwood See the "C" Page -- CASUARINA TREE
 

**Italianelle Pepper See The "P" Page -- PEPPERS

 
Ivy, English Hedera helix
This is another of the very old standbys in English and New England gardens. It is perfect for growing under trees where grass has difficulty thriving. I have not often seen it in more tropical climates and that's a shame because ivy has some unexpected very positive qualities.
Benefits: As it turns out this standby plant is good for the environment and especially good for you. "Available in all kinds of colors and shapes, this climbing vine helps clear out formaldehyde. It’s super versatile, too: You can grow it in hanging baskets, low planters, or even as a topiary." Thank you Yahoo news.
From:
Europe and Western Asia
Photographed:  
Planting and Care:
Text Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013
 
 
IXORAS

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

**Ixora Uxorial martyrs Talisman and Binned or Uxorial cochineal
A member of the coffee family, this flowering bush blooms almost all year, though summer and fall are best. After a while, we had only red and yellow varieties and I like the yellow ones best. I had the pink ones removed as they never seemed to thrive.
Benefits: Ixora is said to have medicinal uses from the flowers and from the bark, though I don't know what they are. In Asia the roots are used to treat diarrhea and stomach problems.
From: The East Indies
Photographed: In our garden at our former home in Montserrat. The white ixora we photographed at a friend's home in Woodland's, Montserrat. The large photograph of red ixora was taken in the Jardin Botanique in Tahiti in 2013
Text & Photographs Copyrighted © KO 2008 and ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013
 

To See More Ixora Please  Click Here!

Ixora, White
Ixora are not my favorite plants. Until I saw the white flowering ixora in the photograph to the left I felt that only the yellow had any merit and even then not much. I had removed all of the pink ixora from our garden and many of the red as well. We still have a few red flowering ixora and one huge yellow flowering plant. In our nursery garden we now have a few cuttings of the white ixora which seems the best of all. The white flowering ixora is wonderfully scented and its delicate flowers seem more at one with its leaves.

 

 
 

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