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ANGEL'S TRUMPET TREE PAGE
 
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PINK TRUMPETS

Angel's Trumpet Brugmansia Variety Unknown
The flowers of this variety start out white turning this lovely soft pink as they open.
Photographed: In our garden at our former home in Montserrat.
Text and Photographs Copyright ©Krika.com 2009

Angel's Trumpet Brugmansia Variety Unknown
This was my first encounter with angel trumpets and it was love at first sight. Imagine seeing an angel entwined with a banana passion fruit vine and you can die and go to plant heaven. This vine has a lot of names so to make it easier for you to read about, its Latin name is Passiflora mollissima. In the photograph to the right you can see a pink hanging flower. To see them as they really are go to the "B" page and scroll down or simply enter the name in the search box above. It really will be worth your time to see these little beauties.
Photographed: This photograph was taken in Tenerillas, Mexico, just outside of Taxco, Mexico.
Text and Photograph Copyright ©Krika.com 2008

PEACH TRUMPETS
 

Angel's Trumpet Brugmansia hybrid
Photographed: In the woods at the Hotel San Buenaventura on Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Text and Photographs Copyright ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2012

Angel's Trumpet Brugmansia hybrid
Photographed: At a hotel in Panajachel at Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Text and Photograph Copyright ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2012

(1)Golden Angel's Trumpet Brugmansia aurea syn Datura aurea Saffera
Benefits: Sheer beauty!
From:
The Andes mountain chain in S. America
Photographed: In the Palermo Botanical Garden in Sicily, Italy.
Planting and Care: As with almost all of the angels, they like to have bright shade or morning or late afternoon sun, plentiful fertilizer and routine rainfall or watering to keep them at their best. At all costs keep them out of strong winds. This variety of Angel's Trumpet is more hardy than many others.
Text and Photograph Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2012

(2) Golden Angel's Trumpet Brugmansia aurea syn Datura aurea Saffera
Photographed: In the Botanical Garden in Naples, Italy.
Copyright ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2012

WHITE TRUMPETS

Angel's Trumpet Brugmansia arborea
This was my first encounter with angel trumpets and it was love at first sight.
Photographed: This photographs was taken in Tenerillas, Mexico, just outside of Taxco, Mexico.
Text and Photographs Copyright ©Krika.com 2008

Angel's Trumpet, Tree Datura Brugmansia arborea
The photograph below was taken just after a very windy storm and it shows how delicate the leaves of the angel trumpet can be. They look awful, but the the beautiful flowers arriving the day after the storm more than make up for the bedraggled appearance of the plant.
From: Ecuador
Photographed:
In our garden at our former home in Montserrat.
Planting and Care: It is said to require less water than other angel's trumpets, but you couldn't prove it by my experience.
Text and Photograph Copyright ©Krika.com 2009

Tree Datura, Angels Trumpet Brugmansia arborea or Datura arborea
This angel is actually a small tree growing up to 25 feet tall and it seems to hold up as an attractive part of the garden even when it is not in bloom. Most angels can get a bit ragged between blooming periods, even though their spectacular show always makes up for any transitional short comings.
From: Ecuador
Photographed: In the Botanical Garden in Naples, Italy.
Planting and Care: Plant the tree datura where it will receive at least a half day of full sun and give it a little less water than the bush varieties.
Text and Photograph Copyright ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2012

Angels Trumpet Tree
Unlike other angels trumpets I have known this one really is a tree. It is fast growing and has relatively soft wood, but it does grow in the shape of a tree and reaches at least 15 feet in height. We planted the small tree pictured below and within six months it was towering over me and covered with blooms. The flowers too are a little more exotic than other angels. I am thrilled to have two now growing in our yard. The blossoms are extraordinary and the leaves are the size of dinner plates, large ones.
Benefits:
From:

Photographed: In our garden at Lake Atitlan in Guatemala.
Planting and Care: This angel does well in a semi shady area with lots of watering or rainfall and with ample fertilizer, natural or otherwise.
Text and Photographs Copyrighted ©GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013

 

 
 

 
 **Angel’s Trumpet Trees Brugmansia arborea (white) or Brugmansia hybrid (peach) Brugmansia Unknown (pink)
In the summer of 2007, we had a wonderful visit to a very small Mexican town called Tenerillas where an American friend has bought property and is planning to build a home for his family. He has a field of flowers that are coveted in Washington, D.C., but which he considers close to weeds -- white freesias. Orchids decorate the ground and flowers seem almost like what I normally think of as weeds. They are everywhere and they are beautiful.

High in this mountainous and sparsely populated area we drove on mud roads seemingly a lifetime away from the colonial silver capital of the area, Taxco. Our friend's Aunt lives there and we visited her home and her chaotically planted acre or so and that is where I fell in love with angel's trumpets.

One year we brought pieces of the branches of a friend's brugmansia with us to Montserrat. We planted them and not long afterward were rewarded with leafy stems. Not long afterward a fellow gardener gave me a branch of his pink angel's trumpet and the love affair began in earnest.

Benefits: Both the flowers and leaves of this exotically beautiful tree are highly poisonous, though parts of the plant are said to become an asthma remedy when smoked. Its many large flowers hang like decorative bells all over the tree which grows to about 15 feet tall.
From: Angel's trumpets are native to Central America.
Planting and Growth: When happy, angel's trumpets grow like weeds and are covered with blossoms. Unfortunately they have proved to be difficult to keep that way. The plants are subject to leaf curl disease caused by the Gemini virus and are also vulnerable to a number of insects and a variety of caterpillars. We have used a soap spray to eliminate the insects, we've handpicked the caterpillars and we've waited out the leaf curl problem. Still the plants looked scraggly and had few blossoms until we discovered their voracious need for fertilizer. They are perking up nicely now that they are fertilized twice a month with a heavy dose of nitrogen along with a more balanced dose of regular fertilizer. They prefer to be planted in a semi shady area in the Caribbean and one where they will be out of the often very strong island winds.
Text and photographs copyrighted ©Krika.com 2009 and © GreenGardeningCookingCuring.com 2013

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